Kubrick’s Napoleon

Getting to work on the film in the mid-60s, after 2001 was released, he sent an assistant around the world to literally follow in Napoleon’s footsteps (“Wherever Napoleon went, I want you to go,” he told him), even getting him to bring back samples of earth from Waterloo so he could match them for the screen.

He read hundreds of books on the man and broke the information down into categories “on everything from his food tastes to the weather on the day of a specific battle.” He gathered together 15,000 location scouting photos and 17,000 slides of Napoleonic imagery.

Vice.

United Artists – when inmates took over the asylum

800px-Fairbanks_-_Pickford_-_Chaplin_-_Griffith
Douglas Fairbanks, Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin, and D. W. Griffith in 1919

Founded in 1919 by D. W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, and Douglas Fairbanks, the studio was premised on allowing actors to control their own interests, rather than being dependent upon commercial studios.

…Pickford, Chaplin, Fairbanks, and Griffith incorporated UA as a joint venture on February 5, 1919. Each held a 25 percent stake in the preferred shares and a 20 percent stake in the common shares of the joint venture, with the remaining 20 percent of common shares held by lawyer and advisor William Gibbs McAdoo. The idea for the venture originated with Fairbanks, Chaplin, Pickford and cowboy star William S. Hart a year earlier. Already Hollywood veterans, the four stars talked of forming their own company to better control their own work.

They were spurred on by established Hollywood producers and distributors who were tightening their control over actor salaries and creative decisions, a process that evolved into the studio system. With the addition of Griffith, planning began, but Hart bowed out before anything was formalized. When he heard about their scheme, Richard A. Rowland, head of Metro Pictures, apparently said, “The inmates are taking over the asylum.”

via wikipedia

Sneak Previews, Season 4 episode 12. Siskel and Ebert look at some movies in 1981

“Siskel and Ebert was a sitcom about two guys who lived in a movie theater.” *

Movies reviewed –
Absence of Malice
Buddy Buddy
Pixote
Ragtime

Sparky the wonder dog shows up at the end to lead into the “dogs of the week”:
The Seven Grandmasters – Ebert’s pick
Adios Amigo – Siskels pick. Incidentally, he assumed it was going to be a dog but it was actually not a dog. Couldn’t find a dog of the week.

Highest-grossing films of 1981
Title /  Distributor / Domestic gross
1. Raiders of the Lost Ark Paramount $212,222,025
2. On Golden Pond Universal $119,285,432
3. Superman II Warner Bros. $108,185,706
4. Arthur Orion Pictures/Warner Bros. $95,461,682
5. Stripes Columbia $85,297,000
6. The Cannonball Run 20th Century Fox $72,179,579
7. Chariots of Fire Warner Bros. $58,972,904
8. For Your Eyes Only United Artists $54,812,802
9. The Four Seasons Universal $50,427,646
10. Time Bandits Embassy Pictures $42,365,581
via wikipedia // Btw – Wikipedia is panhandling. I donated using Amazon pay. Took a minute, maybe. No mussing with entering any new info. Easy.

* Not my joke but I forget where I heard it.