Quarantine Watchlist

Pickpocket
The Outsider
David Crosby – Remember My Name
Friends of Eddie Coyle
The Wanderers
The Atlanta Child Murders
The Secrets of Nimh
Let the Right One In
La Jetee
Angel Heart
Fast, Cheap, and Out of Control
Peterloo
Monty Python and the Holy Grail
Cloud Atlas
Jack Reacher
808
Mulholland Drive
Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead
Withnail & I
Touch of Evil
Tender Mercies
Popcorn
Cromwell
Idiocracy
The Day of the Jackal
A Place at the Table
Dig!

Movies and Tv shows watched from March 13 through July 5

Setlist – Roger Waters Us and Them – Denver, June 3, 2017

Set 1:
Speak to Me (Pink Floyd song)
Breathe (Pink Floyd song)
One of These Days (Pink Floyd song)
Time (Pink Floyd song)
Breathe (Reprise) (Pink Floyd song)
The Great Gig in the Sky (Pink Floyd song)
Welcome to the Machine (Pink Floyd song)
When We Were Young
Déjà Vu
The Last Refugee
Picture That
Wish You Were Here (Pink Floyd song)
The Happiest Days of Our Lives (Pink Floyd song)
Another Brick in the Wall Part 2 (Pink Floyd song)
Another Brick in the Wall Part 3 (Pink Floyd song)

Set 2:
Dogs (Pink Floyd song)
Pigs (Three Different Ones) (Pink Floyd song)
Money (Pink Floyd song)
Us and Them (Pink Floyd song)
Smell the Roses
Brain Damage (Pink Floyd song)
Eclipse (Pink Floyd song) (followed by band introductions)
Vera *(Pink Floyd song)
Bring the Boys Back Home (Pink Floyd song)
Comfortably Numb (Pink Floyd song)

https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/roger-waters/2017/pepsi-center-denver-co-33e70cf9.html

NOTE –
Vera Lynn of the song’s name passed away June 18, 2020.

On their 1979 album The Wall, Pink Floyd released a song titled “Vera”, referencing Vera Lynn and the song  “We’ll Meet Again” with the lyrics “Does anybody here remember Vera Lynn? / Remember how she said that / We would meet again / Some sunny day?”. “We’ll Meet Again” was also used as an intro to the live performances of The Wall in 1980 and 1981 (as can be heard on Is There Anybody Out There? The Wall Live 1980–81). The 1982 film Pink Floyd – The Wall opens with “The Little Boy that Santa Claus Forgot” performed by Lynn.

Wikipedia

Ozzy Osbourne Picks 10 Beatles’ Songs

OzzyBeatles

“I feel so privileged to have been on this planet when the Beatles were born,” says Ozzy. “They are and will forever be the greatest band in the world. I remember talking to Steve Jones of the Sex Pistols. He said, ‘I didn’t like the Beatles.’ I said, ‘there’s something fucking wrong with you.'”

  1. She Loves You – 1963
    This is the one that sucked me in. I was a 14-year-old kid with this blue transistor radio. I heard “She Loves You,” and it floored me. It was as if you knew all the colors in the world. Then someone shows you a brand new color, and you go, “Fucking hell, man.”
  2. I want to Hold Your Hand – 1963
  3. I am the Walrus – 1967
  4. A Day in the Life – 1967
  5. Hey Jude – 1968
  6. Help – 1965
  7. Eleanor Rigby – 1966
  8. Something – 1969
  9. Strawberry Fields Forever – 1967
  10. The Long and Winding Road – 1970
    “It reminds me of winter in England. It’s cold, you’ve got fingerless gloves on. And it makes me sad, because it’s the end of the greatest movie I’d ever seen. You hear Paul going, ‘I’m out of steam. I can’t do this anymore.'”

What would be the dumbest, lamest, most boring super power possible that would still give you a one up over normal people?

What would be the dumbest, lamest, most boring super power possible that would still give you a one up over normal people? from AskReddit

silveredtori
Being able to predict which line in the grocery store will take the shortest amount of time.

ManCalledTrue
The ability to know the intent behind any statement communicated to you.

Omega_art
The ability to stop the hiccups buy yelling “hey stop it.”

juan-de-fuca
Being able to nap instantly Edit: this is not a disorder like narcolepsy, but a superpower that allows you to choose when and how long to nap (airplane trip? No problem. Deadlock traffic? Slam in park, take a nap for a few minutes…)

Guantanamo Mixtape

Here follows a sample of the songs played again and again at maximum volume to break the will of enemy combatants at Guantánamo Bay and other US detention centers around the world. In the context of harsh interrogation with no legal recourse or hope of freedom, these songs and others like them became the soundtrack of Hell for those subjected to them.

Christina Aguilera, “Dirrty”
Barney and Friends, “I Love You Song”
Deicide, “Fuck Your God”
Drowning Pool, “Bodies”
Eminem, “Kim”
Marilyn Manson, “The Beautiful People”
The “Meow Mix” Theme
Nine Inch Nails, “Somewhat Damaged”
Queen, “We Are the Champions”
Britney Spears, “. . . Baby One More Time”

Bruce, Scott G.
The Penguin Book of Hell

Best movies of 2010s – IndieWire

Ten years ago, it seemed like we all had a pretty solid idea of movies — what they can do, who they’re for, and where they’re watched. That idea was inflexible, and supported by a century of precedent. It came with the added benefit of making the people in charge comfortable with the idea that cinema’s future wouldn’t look all that different from its past. DVD sales were strong, Netflix was still just a sad little envelope at the bottom of your mailbox, and China was starting to give studios the biggest safety net it ever had. Perhaps the arrival of James Cameron’s “Avatar” in the waning moments of 2009 could have been seen as a harbinger of strange things to come, but no one in Hollywood has ever lost sleep over a movie that grossed nearly $3 billion.

Things have changed. Cinema is in a constant state of flux, but it’s never mutated faster or more restlessly than it has over the last 10 years. And while the decade will no doubt be remembered for the paradigm shifts precipitated by streaming and monolithic superhero movies, hindsight makes it clear that the definition of film itself is exponentially wider now than it was a decade ago.

https://www.indiewire.com/gallery/best-movies-of-2010s-decade/

The Technium: 68 Bits of Unsolicited Advice

It’s my birthday. I’m 68. I feel like pulling up a rocking chair and dispensing advice to the young ‘uns. Here are 68 pithy bits of unsolicited advice which I offer as my birthday present to all of you.

• Don’t be the best. Be the only.

• Everyone is shy. Other people are waiting for you to introduce yourself to them, they are waiting for you to send them an email, they are waiting for you to ask them on a date. Go ahead.

• If you are not falling down occasionally, you are just coasting.

Read the whole list: http://kk.org/

Freakonomics has an episode on the list: Freakonomics

Who doesn’t love a little wisdom once in a while? We all seek it out — in the people we know, or would like to know; in philosophy and science and religion; in adventure and travel and all sorts of mind-bending encounters. Most wisdom is presented in a manner befitting its ambition, with an important-sounding title and a package designed to impress. But sometimes the wisdom is just sitting there — on a website, with a title like, “68 Bits of Unsolicited Advice.” That’s what Kevin Kelly called the list he wrote on the occasion of his 68th birthday. And he published it on his website: kk.org.

NORMAN MAILER: Ten Favorite American Novels

With the exception of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which I reread recently, the other books were devoured in my freshman year at Harvard, and gave me the desire, which has never gone completely away, to be a writer, to be an American writer. They’re all selections from the mainstream of American novels, not a surprise on the list, which separates me, I suspect, from my colleagues. But it’s an honest list, even if it doesn’t bring a deserving writer out of obscurity. Freshman year at Harvard is luminous because of these books.

John Dos Passos
U.S.A.

Mark Twain
THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN

James T. Farrell
STUDS LONIGAN

Thomas Wolfe
LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL

John Steinbeck
THE GRAPES OF WRATH

F. Scott Fitzgerald
THE GREAT GATSBY

Ernest Hemingway
THE SUN ALSO RISES

John O’Hara
APPOINTMENT IN SAMARRA

James M. Cain
THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE

Herman Melville
MOBY DICK

From – The Reader’s Catalog: An Annotated Selection of More Than 40,000 of the Best Books in Print in 208 Categories (Reader’s Catalogue)

Classic Rock – Top 50

Selection from:
Rock n Roll America’s
Top 1,000 Classic Rock Songs

Rank Song Artist
1 Stairway to Heaven Led Zeppelin
2 Hey Jude Beatles
3 All Along the Watchtower Hendrix, Jimi
4 Satisfaction Rolling Stones
5 Like A Rolling Stone Dylan, Bob
6 Another Brick In The Wall Pink Floyd
7 Won’t Get Fooled Again Who
8 Hotel California Eagles
9 Layla Derek And The Dominos
10 Sweet Home Alabama Lynyrd Skynyrd
11 Bohemian Rhapsody Queen
12 Riders on the Storm Doors
13 Rock and Roll Led Zeppelin
14 Barracuda Heart
15 La Grange ZZ Top
16 Dream On Aerosmith
17 You Really Got Me Van Halen
18 More Than a Feeling Boston
19 Sultans of Swing Dire Straits
20 You Shook Me All Night Long AC/DC
21 Kashmir Led Zeppelin
22 Lola Kinks
23 Carry on Wayward Son Kansas
24 Tiny Dancer John, Elton
25 Locomotive Breath Jethro Tull
26 I Still Haven’t Found U2
27 Magic Carpet Ride Steppenwolf
28 Free Bird Lynyrd Skynyrd
29 Purple Haze Hendrix, Jimi
30 Tom Sawyer Rush
31 Let It Be Beatles
32 Baba O’Riley Who
33 The Joker Miller, Steve
34 Roxanne Police
35 Time Pink Floyd
36 It’s A Long Way to the Top AC/DC
37 Whole Lotta Love Led Zeppelin
38 The Chain Fleetwood Mac
39 I’ve Seen All Good People Yes
40 For What It’s Worth Buffalo Springfield
41 Black Magic Woman Santana
42 Nights in White Satin Moody Blues
43 While My Guitar Gently Weeps Beatles
44 Gimme Shelter Rolling Stones
45 Gold Dust Woman Fleetwood Mac
46 Fortunate Son CCR
47 American Pie McLean, Don
48 Bad Company Bad Company
49 Waitin’ For The Bus/Jesus Just Left ZZ Top
50 Over the Hills and Far Away Led Zeppelin

CTRL f  *analysis* on the whole 1000 list
Love – 41
Baby – 6
Money – 8 (Includes Eddie Money)
Car – 22 (Includes The Cars)
Rock – 27
Get – 14
Summer – 2
Night – 31

Woman – 13:

948 Rock And Roll Woman Buffalo Springfield
910 Just Like A Woman Dylan, Bob
779 A Woman In Love Petty, Tom
717 Kentucky Woman Deep Purple
519 Woman From Tokyo Deep Purple
496 Pretty Woman Van Halen
310 Evil Woman ELO
307 Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress Hollies
245 L.A. Woman Doors
204 American Woman Guess Who
180 Witchy Woman Eagles
45 Gold Dust Woman Fleetwood Mac
41 Black Magic Woman Santana

How is your New Year’s resolution holding up? – AskReddit

We are nearly 1/3rd of the way into 2020, how is your New Year’s resolution holding up? from r/AskReddit

forman98
I made a resolution to start bringing my lunch to work instead of eating out everyday. I have to say it’s going pretty well.

probably-a-lunatic
Resolved to be more positive and to write down at least one thing I’m happy/grateful for each day.

I can legitimately say it has made me a happier person, and I’m actively looking for the good, not the bad.

Haven’t missed a day yet, and usually I write at least 3 examples. Definitely want to keep it up for the rest of the year, or hell, even the rest of my life.

shampoo_and_dick
Mine is staying alive. So far all good. Let’s see what May has to offer.

How about we have a game called, “Survival: 2020” ?

mattsffrd
I vowed I would stay inside and learn about gay tiger meth cults, so it’s going pretty well.

The 50 Greatest Rock Memoirs of All Time – Rolling Stone List

The 50 Greatest Rock Memoirs of All Time
Awesome rock & roll reads, from Keith Richards and Patti Smith to Slash and Nikki Sixx
Rob Sheffield

Of the ones on the list that I’ve read, they were worth checking out. And now I have a number of books I can look forward to.

Here’s his take on Johnny Rotten’s autobiography:

John Lydon: ‘Rotten: No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs’ (1993)
The former Johnny Rotten has all the dirt about how the Sex Pistols pissed off the world. But he’s also got poignant details about his hardscrabble youth in London’s Irish-immigrant squalor, raised by a mother even more badass than he was. He also shares his deep hatred for religion, the Queen, the other Sex Pistols, hippies, rich people, racists, sexists, the English political system, Malcolm McLaren, and, of course, Pink Floyd. “A lot of people feel the Sex Pistols were just negative,” he says. “I agree, and what the fuck is wrong with that? Sometimes the absolute most positive thing you can be in a boring society is completely negative.”

Rob Sheffield
https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-lists/books-greatest-rock-memoirs-of-all-time-161198/

21 of the best sci-fi books everyone should read | WIRED UK

Dune, by Frank Herbert (1965)

In 2012, Wired US readers voted Dune the best science-fiction novel of all time. It’s also the best-selling of all time, and has inspired a mammoth universe, including 18 books set over 34,000 years and a terrible 1984 movie adaptation by David Lynch, his worst film by far. A hopefully better effort is currently in production, directed by Denis Villeneuve. The series is set 20,000 years in the future in galaxies stuck in the feudal ages, where computers are banned for religious reasons and noble families rule whole planets. We focus on the planet Arrakis, which holds a material used as a currency throughout the Universe for its rarity and mind-enhancing powers. Lots of giant sandworms, too.

Wired

15 American Plays It’d Be Great to See Revived | The Village Voice

Everybody knows theater critics are useless. All year round, they occupy free seats, and in return they do nothing but complain, complain, complain. Why, you ask, can’t they do something useful for a change?

So I was complaining (as usual), a few weeks back (Voice, May 23), about having to review the same plays over and over, when the world, so I claimed, was “full of unperformed great plays” deserving revival. In response, I only got press releases announcing that next season, like the last one, would be full of familiar titles. Some of them worth seeing again, no doubt, but not exactly unperformed rarities likely to fill a desperate hunger in our collective theatrical soul. Why can’t our theater find at least a few less well-known plays that are worth a fresh look?

That drove me, shockingly, to do something useful: compile my list of plays we rarely or never see—plays we should be seeing, because they add some quality, which our theater currently lacks.

Sin (A Cardinal Deposed) (2004) by Michael Murphy. Not trying to raise religious hackles here. Murphy’s docudrama, premiered by the New Group, uses Cardinal Law’s depositions before the Boston courts to reveal the inner workings of a bureaucracy’s systematic cover-up of child abuse—something that has tragically spread as a matter of public concern, not only within world Catholicism, but in secular realms like Penn State and Horace Mann School. Murphy’s dramatic map of the Boston case remains a painful prototype of far too many instances revealed subsequently.

The Danube (1984) and The Conduct of Life (1985) by María Irene Fornés: Two full-evening works on very different topics, both still burning. The first, depicting star-crossed lovers forced to confront ecological disaster, now seems stunningly prophetic. The second deals with a government-employed military torturer and the women in his life. Granted, I don’t see TV stars lining up to play these scripts. But I wish they would.

Ready for the River (1991) by Neal Bell: Bell is one of my leading candidates for America’s most unreasonably neglected playwright (though PTP/NYC has just revived Monster, his excellent adaptation of Shelley’s Frankenstein). You can gauge his prescience, from the opening of this play’s harrowing, surreal journey—a farmer’s wife and daughter fleeing because he has just murdered the banker who came to foreclose on the family farm. Sounds dated, I suppose.

The Fabulous Miss Marie (1971) by Ed Bullins. First produced, memorably, at Harlem’s Lafayette Theatre, Bullins’s sardonic study of L.A.’s affluent black couples, living to par-tay while sneering at civil rights marchers, uses vaudeville stylization and short, cogent scenes to treat its characters with a spicy mix of satirical malice and Chekhovian compassion.

In the Bar of a Tokyo Hotel (1969) by Tennessee Williams. A failing genius painter and his fearsomely unhappy wife, locked in Strindbergian love-hate, fuel this most challengingly dense of Williams’s texts. But anyone who saw Donald Madden and Anne Meacham play it Off-Broadway knows its riveting power.

Who’ll Save the Plowboy? (1962) by Frank D. Gilroy. Produced by the Phoenix Theatre, this play put Gilroy on the theatrical map; a few years later, The Subject Was Roses cemented his reputation. Harsher and bleaker than the later work, Plowboy won the 1962 Best Play Obie Award.

The Gingham Dog (1969) by Lanford Wilson. Signature Theatre has kindly announced Wilson’s masterpiece, The Mound Builders, for next season. But they, or somebody, should tackle this somberly moving four-hander, mapping the breakup of an interracial marriage, which got an unjustly sniffy reception at its first production.

Lagrima del Diablo (The Devil’s Tear) (1980) by Dan Owens. Political upheaval on a Caribbean island, naturally seasoned with a dash of vodoun, centering on a dictator, an exiled archbishop, and a mute girl with prophetic powers. Owens, a cunning, complex writer, was treated handsomely by the Negro Ensemble Company, but the press, as so often, had its mind elsewhere.

Boy on the Straight-Back Chair (1969) by Ronald Tavel. A Southwestern serial killer, a startling theatricalist form, and a style harshly mixing self-aware joking with mordant ruminations on American violence: Sounds like the playwright who invented the Ridiculous, doesn’t it? It needs doing as the American Place Theatre did it then, with lucid ferocity and no camp.

The Cocktail Hour (1988) by A.R. Gurney. New Gurney plays still crop up a few times a year, but New York really deserves another chance at this funniest and wisest of the gentlemanly playwright’s rueful reflections on his vanishing elite-WASP class. It requires a four-person cast as brilliant as the Off-Broadway original; consider yourselves challenged.

The Ceremony of Innocence (1967) by Ronald Ribman. You’re an American, your country’s mired in a meaningless war, what do you write about? If you’re Ronald Ribman—another leading candidate for the title of our most underrated playwright—you create a fierce drama about the medieval King Ethelred, who retreats to a monastery rather than wage war. Another American Place Theatre discovery that urgently deserves rediscovering.

The Credeaux Canvas (2001) by Keith Bunin. Art, love, forgery, and integrity, all wrapped in one taut, tidy package about a chameleonic painter whose businesslike buddy convinces him to fake an old-master canvas. Playwrights Horizons did splendidly by it, with the then-unknown Annie Parisse and Lee Pace as model and artist. Young wannabes, take note.

A Few Stout Individuals (2002) by John Guare. Everyone’s favorite theatrical fantasist spun this dizzying web of words for the Signature’s all-Guare season. The dying U.S. Grant, ruthless general and hapless President, struggles to make sense of his life, nursemaided by his would-be publisher, Mark Twain, and a host of Gilded Age figures low and high. I’d gladly take this exhilarating trip again.

Zero Positive (1988) by Harry Kondoleon. High on the list of writers one can’t forget, Kondoleon turned out maddeningly original plays that shed their light prismatically, in disorienting multicolored flashes. At least six of Kondoleon’s plays merit revival, but this one, set partly in an AIDS ward and given a troubled premiere at the Public Theater, manifestly leads the disorientation course

  • Sin (A Cardinal Deposed) (2004) by Michael Murphy.
  • The Danube (1984) and The Conduct of Life (1985) by María Irene Fornés
  • Ready for the River (1991) by Neal Bell
  • The Fabulous Miss Marie (1971) by Ed Bullins.
  • In the Bar of a Tokyo Hotel (1969) by Tennessee Williams.
  • Who’ll Save the Plowboy? (1962) by Frank D. Gilroy.
  • The Gingham Dog (1969) by Lanford Wilson.
  • Lagrima del Diablo (The Devil’s Tear) (1980) by Dan Owens.
  • Boy on the Straight-Back Chair (1969) by Ronald Tavel.
  • The Cocktail Hour (1988) by A.R. Gurney.
  • The Ceremony of Innocence (1967)
  • The Credeaux Canvas (2001) by Keith Bunin.
  • A Few Stout Individuals (2002) by John Guare.
  • Zero Positive (1988) by Harry Kondoleon.

MICHAEL FEINGOLD, JULY 4, 2012
https://www.villagevoice.com/2012/07/04/15-american-plays-itd-be-great-to-see-revived/

3 Audio book recommendations

I found these books easier to grok via audio. The cast of Hamlet was particularly good. 

Hamlet
Distressed by his father’s death and his mother’s over-hasty remarriage, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, is faced by a specter from beyond the grave bearing a grim message of murder and revenge. The young prince is driven to the edge of madness by his struggle to understand the situation he finds himself in and to do his duty. Many others, including Hamlet’s beloved, the innocent Ophelia, are swept up in his tragedy.
Amazon

Lolita
When it was published in 1955, Lolita immediately became a cause celebre because of the freedom and sophistication with which it handled the unusual erotic predilections of its protagonist. But Vladimir Nabokov’s wise, ironic, elegant masterpiece owes its stature as one of the 20th century’s novels of record not to the controversy its material aroused but to its author’s use of that material to tell a love story that is shocking in its beauty and tenderness.
Amazon

Herzog
Like the protagonists of most of Bellow’s novels – Dangling ManThe VictimSeize the DayHenderson the Rain King, etc. – Herzog is a man seeking balance, trying to regain a foothold on his life. Thrown out of his ex-wife’s house, he retreats to his abandoned home in Ludeyville, a remote village in the Berkshire mountains to which Herzog had previously moved his wife and friends. Here amid the dust and vermin of the disused house, Herzog begins scribbling letters to family, friends, lovers, colleagues, enemies, dead philosophers, ex- Presidents – anyone with whom he feels compelled to set the record straight. The letters, we learn, are never sent. They are a means to cure himself of the immense psychic strain of his failed second marriage, a method by which he can recognize truths that will free him to love others and to learn to abide with the knowledge of death. In order to do so he must confront the fact that he has been a bad husband, a loving but poor father, an ungrateful child, a distant brother, an egoist to friends, and an apathetic citizen.
Amazon

Hardcover fiction best sellers, December 18, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/books/best-sellers/hardcover-fiction/

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING
by Delia Owens
In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect.

THE GUARDIANS
by John Grisham
Cullen Post, a lawyer and Episcopal minister, antagonizes some ruthless killers when he takes on a wrongful conviction case.

CRISS CROSS
by James Patterson
The 27th book in the Alex Cross series. Copycat crimes make the detective question whether an innocent man was executed.

THE INSTITUTE
by Stephen King
Children with special talents are abducted and sequestered in an institution where the sinister staff seeks to extract their gifts through harsh methods.

A MINUTE TO MIDNIGHT
by David Baldacci
When Atlee Pine returns to her hometown to investigate her sister’s kidnapping from 30 years ago, she winds up tracking a potential serial killer.

THE DUTCH HOUSE
by Ann Patchett
A sibling relationship is impacted when the family goes from poverty to wealth and back again over the course of many decades.

BLUE MOON
by Lee Child
Jack Reacher gets caught up in a turf war between Ukrainian and Albanian gangs.

TWISTED TWENTY-SIX
by Janet Evanovich
The 26th book in the Stephanie Plum series. A New Jersey gangster’s associates go after a bounty hunter’s widowed grandmother.

THE TESTAMENTS
by Margaret Atwood
In a sequel to “The Handmaid’s Tale,” old secrets bring three women together as the Republic of Gilead’s theocratic regime shows signs of decay.

OLIVE, AGAIN
by Elizabeth Strout
In a follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “Olive Kitteridge,” new relationships, including a second marriage, are encountered in a seaside town in Maine.