Tag: Music

Steve Vai Remembering Eddie Van Halen – Rolling Stone

This would be a very interesting story for guitar players, I think: I was at my house in Hollywood, and in my studio, I was using my guitar, my rig, my pedals, my amps. And Edward came in. We were just hanging out and talking, and he says to me, “Let me show you this one thing I was working on.” And he takes my guitar and he starts playing and I realized instantly that it was Edward Van Halen. It didn’t sound anything like me. It had that “brown sound.” It was everything we love about Ed’s tone. He was playing my exact gear, and it sounded like him.

Rolling Stone

(Not Just) Knee Deep – Funkadelic

The song has been heavily sampled by many artists. Hip hop group De La Soul sampled the intro to the song in their hit “Me Myself and I“, which reached #34 on the Billboard Pop Charts and #1 on the R&B Charts.

Also LL Cool J (“Nitro”), Everlast (“Never Missin A Beat”), Tone Lōc (“Funky Cold Medina“), MC Hammer & Deion Sanders (“Straight to My Feet”), The rap group Mass 187 (“Swang Your Hips)”, G-Funk Intro & his unreleased track “Do U Remember”. Tha Dogg Pound used the sample in their unreleased track “Can’t C Us”. Geto Boys sampled the intro for “Homie Don’t Play That”. The Black Eyed Peas also used the beat behind it to remix their hit single “Shut Up“. X Clan sampled the song in “Funkin’ Lesson”. It was also interpolated in the song “Get Away” by Bobby Brown. In 2014, it was sampled in Jessie J‘s “Seal Me with a Kiss”.

EPMD sampled it in their song “Gold Digger”, and Digital Underground used it in two of their songs, “Kiss You Back” and “Bran Nu Swetta”.

Rapper Tupac Shakur sampled the song for his “Intro/Bomb First (My Second Reply)” and his Dr. Dre produced track “Can’t C Me”.

In 1997, Vanessa Williams sampled “Knee Deep” for her song “Happiness“.

Dr. Dre’s song, “Fuck wit Dre Day (And Everybody’s Celebratin’)“, is based on “Knee Deep”.

South Korean girl band Mamamoo song “Um Oh Ah Yeh” from their third mini-album Pink Funky was influenced from it.

Wikipedia

The 50 Quintessential New York Albums – Village Voice List

Quintessential – representing the most perfect or typical example of a quality or class.

https://www.villagevoice.com/2014/02/18/the-50-most-nyc-albums-ever/
VILLAGE VOICE STAFF
FEBRUARY 18, 2014

For the past week we’ve been locked in the torch of the Statue of Liberty, subsisting on nothing but Russ & Daughters’ lox, listening to the best records about, by, and for New York City through headphones endorsed by Lou Reed. Our mission: to come up with a list of the 50 Most NYC Albums Ever; albums born of the five boroughs that best capture what it’s like to live, love, struggle, and exist in the sprawling, unforgiving, culturally dense metropolis we pay too much to call home. The albums we finally agreed upon capture everything from the unaffected cool of the Lower East Side to the horn-spiked salsa of Spanish Harlem and much more. So let’s get to it. Here, now, the 50 most quintessential New York records. Apologies in advance for The Muppets Take Manhattan not making the cut.

50. Yeah Yeah Yeahs – Fever to Tell (2003) The Yeah Yeah Yeahs might not be the hipster band du jour anymore, but Fever to Tell is still a perfect downtown New York record, gritty and artsy and stylish.

49. Jay Z – The Blueprint (2001) Jay-Z famously mocked Nas for having a “one hot album every 10-year average.” And yet Jay himself has only reached the height of his potential three times in a nearly 30-year career.

48. Jim Carroll – Catholic Boy (1980) With his New York drug-drawl and angel-headed hipster-hustler lyrics, poet-turned-musician Jim Carroll spoke-sang with an urgency that belied his drug of choice.

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