Tag: Music

Kiss Me – Sixpence None the Richer

Kiss me, out of the bearded barley
Nightly, beside the green, green grass
Swing, swing, (swing, swing) swing the spinning step
You wear those shoes and I will wear that dress

Oh, kiss me, beneath the milky twilight
Lead me out on the moonlit floor
Lift your open hand
Strike up the band and make the fireflies dance
Silver moon’s sparkling
So kiss me

Kiss me, (kiss me) down by the broken tree house
Swing me, (swing me) upon its hanging tire
Bring, bring, (bring, bring) bring your flowered hat
We’ll take the trail marked on your father’s map

Oh, kiss me, beneath the milky twilight
Lead me out on the moonlit floor
Lift your open hand
Strike up the band and make the fireflies dance
Silver moon’s sparkling
So kiss me

Kiss me, beneath the milky twilight
Lead me out on the moonlit floor
Lift your open hand
Strike up the band and make the fireflies dance
Silver moon’s sparkling
So kiss me

So kiss me
So kiss me
So kiss me

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sixpence_None_the_Richer

Shoegaze – Why is it Called That?

My Bloody Valentine is most famous for elevating “shoegaze,” a dreamy style of guitar music named for the activity of manipulating the technology — literally, gazing at the pedals next to your shoes — required to conjure such a swirling sound. The band is also famous for disappearing: After releasing its second album, “Loveless,” in 1991, it was mostly inactive for nearly 20 years, as rumors of a follow-up swelled and dispersed. After reuniting to perform live, the band surprised everyone in 2013 with “m b v,” a new record that appeared online in the middle of the night with no advance notice, instantly crashing the band’s website as fans swarmed to download it.

NYTIMES

Here’s Where the Story Ends – The Sundays

People I know
Places I go
Make me feel tongue tied
I can see how
People look down
They’re on the inside

Here’s where the story ends

People I see
Weary of me
Showing my good side
I can see how
People look down
I’m on the outside

Here’s where the story ends
Ooh, here’s where the story ends

It’s that little souvenir
Of a terrible year
Which makes my eyes feel sore
Oh, I never should have said
The books that you read
Were all I loved you for
It’s that little souvenir
Of a terrible year
Which makes me wonder why
And it’s the memories of the shed
That make me turn red
Surprise, surprise, surprise

Crazy, I know
Places I go
Make me feel so tired
I can see how
People look down
I’m on the outside

Oh, here’s where the story ends
Ooh, here’s where the story ends

It’s that little souvenir
Of a terrible year
Which makes my eyes feel sore
And who ever would’ve thought
The books that you brought
Were all I loved you for?
Oh, the devil in me said
Go down to the shed
I know where I belong
But the only thing I ever really wanted to say
Was wrong, was wrong, was wrong
It’s that little souvenir
Of a colorful year
Which makes me smile inside
So I cynically, cynically say
The world is that way
Surprise, surprise, surprise, surprise, surprise

Here’s, where the story ends
Ooh, here’s, where the story ends

Playing Music for Angels and Devils, Clapton Anecdote

Eric Clapton, whose “Crossroads” with Cream is the only later version to include the line about Willie Brown and achieves an intensity and power of its own, must have thought long and hard about the Johnson legend. After an extended bout with heroin addiction, he reemerged in the early seventies playing in a more restrained, less bluesy style. In 1974, Rolling Stone interviewer Steve Turner asked him if the change in his music reflected a change in attitude, and instead of answering the question directly, he told Turner a story. “Once with the Dominos [a post-Cream Clapton group] , we dropped some acid in San Francisco,” he said, “and apart from the fact that the guitar was made of rubber, every bad lick I had, every naughty lick, blues lick whatever you want to call it, turned the audience into all these devils in sort of red coats and things. And then I’d play a sweet one, and they all turned into angels. I prefer playing to angels, personally.”

Deep Blues: A Musical and Cultural History of the Mississippi Delta
Robert Palmer

No One Knows – Queens Of The Stone Age

We get some rules to follow
That and this, these and those
No one knows
We get these pills to swallow
How they stick in your throat?
Tastes like gold
Oh, what you do to me
No one knows

And I realize you’re mine
Indeed a fool am I
And I realize you’re mine
Indeed a fool am I

I journey through the desert
Of the mind with no hope
I follow
I drift along the ocean
Dead lifeboats in the sun
And come undone
Pleasantly caving in
I come undone

And I realize you’re mine
Indeed a fool am I
And I realize you’re mine
Indeed a fool am I

Heaven smiles above me
What a gift here below
But no one knows
The gift that you give to me
No one knows

I’m Guessing They Don’t Sound Like Peter, Paul and Mary

Cannibal Corpse is an American death metal band formed in Buffalo, New York in December 1988. The band has released fourteen studio albums, two box sets, four video albums, and two live albums. The band has had little radio or television exposure throughout its career, although a cult following began to build with the releases of their early albums, including Butchered at Birth (1991) and Tomb of the Mutilated (1992). As of 2015, they achieved worldwide sales of two million units for combined sales of all their albums, making them the top-selling death metal band of all time.

The band has had several lineup changes. In February 1993, founding member and guitarist Bob Rusay was dismissed from the group (after which he became a golf instructor) and was ultimately replaced by Malevolent Creation guitarist Rob Barrett. In 1995, during recording sessions for a new album, singer Chris Barnes was dismissed because of personal differences with the rest of the band and was replaced by Monstrosity singer George “Corpsegrinder” Fisher. Barnes went on to perform with the band Six Feet Under and, later, Torture Killer.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannibal_Corpse

Photograph – Def Leppard

JOE ELLIOTT: When we did “Photograph,” we went mental. Phil wore a polka-dot top. Steve wore all white. The day before the shoot, I had £25 in my pocket, and I went down Kings Road in London to get some clothes. I found a pair of black pleather trousers that were too short by about four inches, so I bought them, and some leg warmers, which I’d seen in the TV show Fame. When I was done buying the pants and the effeminate leggings, I had £8 left. I walked past a punk rock shop and they had a red-white-and-blue Union Jack shirt in the window for £7.99. It was all I could afford, and it was loud. After that video, the shirt became so iconic that we sold almost 100,000 of them on tour that summer. We couldn’t wait to make the videos. The morning we shot “Photograph” is when I frosted my hair for the first time. When “Photograph” came out, I was a blond bombshell. David Mallet was hilarious. He called everybody “dear boy.” He was very posh, very theatrical. When we turned up to shoot “Photograph” at Battersea Power Station, he’d built that whole set. There was gridding on the floor with lights underneath. It was fantastic. The girls in the cages have become a little dated, but at the time, it hadn’t been done so much, so it worked fine.

DAVID MALLET: Why did I put the girls in a cage? Girls belong in cages, come on.

JANI LANE, Warrant: I was a junior in high school, and when I saw “Photograph,” I was like, Oh my god.

Tannenbaum, Rob; Marks, Craig. I Want My MTV