Top 10 Cities to Visit in 2020 – Lonely Planet

1. Salzburg, Austria
2. Washington, D.C., United States
3. Cairo, Egypt
4. Galway, Ireland
5. Bonn, Germany
6. La Paz, Bolivia
7. Kochi, India
8. Vancouver, Canada
9. Dubai, United Arab Emirates
10. Denver, United States

Denver’s elevated position as one of the USA’s most charming boomtowns has reached new heights as the Mile High City enters its latest phase of growth, creative energy and damn good food. Construction cranes dot the mountain-studded horizon and empty lots turn into hip new hotels seemingly overnight, while new food halls such as Milk Market satisfy appetites with an eclectic mix of farm-to-table and international fare. The mind-bending Santa Fe art experience Meow Wolf has installed a psychedelic ride called ‘Kaleidoscape’ at Elitch Gardens Theme and Water Park as a precursor to a permanent $50-million Meow Wolf installation to come in 2021. Meanwhile, the fascinating Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art has moved into a magnetic Olson Kundig–designed building within the city’s Golden Triangle Creative District

lonelyplanet.com

The Giving Machine – Altruistic Vending Machine

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Imagine swiping your credit card at a vending machine and instead of buying a candy bar for yourself, you buy a piglet for a family in a third-world country. Or a polio vaccine. Or a pair of shoes. Or 100 meals for your local foodbank. With the #LightTheWorld Giving Machines, that’s exactly what happens. The Giving Machines provide a way for people to quickly and easily help those in need and make their Christmas season a little more meaningful for themselves – and countless others.

Writer Square
16th and Lawrence [SouthWest corner]
Downtown Denver
The machines will open November 26th 2019 at 11am and be open every day from 9am to 11pm through January 1, 2020

https://givingmachinesdenver.com/

I bought three of ‘2 meals at a women’s shelter’, which were $3.50 each.

State of RTD, Westword on

Over the course of a single weekday, people in metro Denver collectively travel more than 110 million miles — greater than the distance between the Earth and the sun. More than 1.8 million employed adults and 650,000 students need to get to work or school and back, and over 2 million passenger cars, freight trucks, buses and other vehicles clog the region’s streets and highways. Though it’s currently only responsible for moving a small fraction of these commuters through this vast transportation network, the RTD system has to balance a staggering array of competing needs and priorities.

During any given morning rush hour, perhaps 100,000 people board an RTD bus or train, bound for 100,000 destinations across a service area the size of Delaware. Eight hundred buses, driven by 800 operators, work their way between nearly 10,000 passenger stops along 169 fixed routes. Two hundred rail vehicles are weaving through downtown traffic or speeding through railroad crossings from Wheat Ridge to Peña Boulevard.

RTD Sees a Future That Runs on Transit — but First, It Has to Weather a Crisis
Chase Woodruff, Westword

Random pics Denver, Thursday 8/28/2019

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These pics are from later in the day. On my way into work, around 7 am, I walked past a guy sitting on the sidewalk openly smoking weed from a pipe. I also saw police and firemen attending to a guy laying on his back, shirtless. Not unusual to see someone smoking cannabis in public, but it seemed a bit early. What was going on with other guy I don’t know.