Tag: History

10 Important / Noteworthy / Memorable / Interesting Documentaries

The Times of Harvey Milk – 1984
A documentary of the successful career and assassination of San Francisco’s first elected gay city supervisor.

Paris is Burning – 1990
A chronicle of New York’s drag scene in the 1980s, focusing on balls, voguing and the ambitions and dreams of those who gave the era its warmth and vitality.

Incident at Oglala – 1992
This film describes the events surrounding a 1975 shootout at the Pine Ridge reservation in S. Dakota where two FBI agents were killed.

Crumb – 1994
An intimate portrait of controversial cartoonist Robert Crumb and his traumatized family.

Hoop Dreams – 1994
A film following the lives of two inner-city Chicago boys who struggle to become college basketball players on the road to going professional.

Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills – 1996
A horrific triple child murder leads to an indictment and trial of three nonconformist boys based on questionable evidence.

Filth and the Fury – 2000
A film about the career of the notorious punk rock band, the Sex Pistols.

Sunshine Hotel – 2001
A portrait of one of the few remaining men only ‘flophouses’ on New York City’s infamous skid row, the Bowery.

Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room – 2005
A documentary about the Enron corporation, its faulty and corrupt business practices, and how they led to its fall.

I’m Not Your Negro – 2016
Writer James Baldwin tells the story of race in modern America with his unfinished novel, Remember This House.

March 7, 1965 – Bloody Sunday – Selma, Alabama

The Selma to Montgomery marches were three protest marches, held in 1965, along the 54-mile (87 km) highway from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital of Montgomery. The marches were organized by nonviolent activists to demonstrate the desire of African-American citizens to exercise their constitutional right to vote, in defiance of segregationist repression; they were part of a broader voting rights movement underway in Selma and throughout the American South. By highlighting racial injustice, they contributed to passage that year of the Voting Rights Act, a landmark federal achievement of the civil rights movement…

“Bloody Sunday” events
On March 7, 1965, an estimated 525 to 600 civil rights marchers headed southeast out of Selma on U.S. Highway 80. The march was led by John Lewis of SNCC and the Reverend Hosea Williams of SCLC, followed by Bob Mants of SNCC and Albert Turner of SCLC. The protest went according to plan until the marchers crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, where they encountered a wall of state troopers and county posse waiting for them on the other side.

County sheriff Jim Clark had issued an order for all white men in Dallas County over the age of twenty-one to report to the courthouse that morning to be deputized. Commanding officer John Cloud told the demonstrators to disband at once and go home. Rev. Hosea Williams tried to speak to the officer, but Cloud curtly informed him there was nothing to discuss. Seconds later, the troopers began shoving the demonstrators, knocking many to the ground and beating them with nightsticks. Another detachment of troopers fired tear gas, and mounted troopers charged the crowd on horseback.

Televised images of the brutal attack presented Americans and international audiences with horrifying images of marchers left bloodied and severely injured, and roused support for the Selma Voting Rights Campaign. Amelia Boynton, who had helped organize the march as well as marching in it, was beaten unconscious. A photograph of her lying on the road of the Edmund Pettus Bridge appeared on the front page of newspapers and news magazines around the world. Another marcher, Lynda Blackmon Lowery, age 14, was brutally beaten by a police officer during the march, and needed seven stitches for a cut above her right eye and 28 stitches on the back of her head. John Lewis suffered a skull fracture and bore scars on his head from the incident for the rest of his life. In all, 17 marchers were hospitalized and 50 treated for lesser injuries; the day soon became known as “Bloody Sunday” within the black community.

Wikipedia

This Is Where We Came In – Old Time Movie Watching

Where was I? Oh, yes. Films. It is hard to believe that my parents’ generation would walk into a cinema when it suited them, without paying any attention to what film it was that they were going to see. Indeed they weren’t even concerned whether the film had just started, or was halfway through, or was in the middle of the final chase sequence. They would just happily settle into their seats with their sweets and cigarettes and start trying to decipher the plot, and who was the villain, and why everybody was in Hamburg, and then the film would end, and they would sit patiently through the advertisements and newsreels, eat an ice cream, and then the film would begin again, and they would finally discover who everyone was, and why they had all gone to Hamburg, and at exactly the moment when they’d understood what the hell was going on, and could now enjoy the denouement, they’d all shout, “Oh! This is where we came in!”— and leave. How are you supposed to write for an audience like that? The great farce-writer Ben Travers once told me that in the ’30s, posh “country people” would invariably arrive in their seats at the back of the stalls about twenty minutes late (to show that they were not bound by the trivial conventions of the proletariat) and that he therefore always added a brief summary of the plot at that point, so the toffs could get up to speed. But Ben at least knew roughly when they’d be arriving. Did the “Oh! This is where we came in!” brigade ever consider why they liked watching a movie in the wrong order? Well, not my parents, anyway.

Cleese, John. So, Anyway…

Highest Grossing Films of 1990

Highest-grossing films of 1990

1 Ghost Paramount $505,702,588
2 Home Alone Fox $476,684,675
3 Pretty Woman Disney $463,406,268
4 Dances with Wolves Orion $424,208,848
5 Total Recall Sony / Carolco $261,317,921
6 Back to the Future Part III Universal $244,527,583
7 Die Hard 2 Fox $240,031,094
8 Presumed Innocent Warner Bros. $221,303,188
9 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles New Line $201,965,915
10 Kindergarten Cop Universal $201,957,688

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1990_in_film#Highest-grossing_films

Seeing Your Life Onscreen – Aaron Sorkin Discusses The Social Network – Deadline Interview

DEADLINE: We know Mark Zuckerberg didn’t cooperate but did you ever meet Eduardo Saverin, the character played by Andrew Garfield?
SORKIN: Once Eduardo signed that non-disclosure agreement after his settlement, he disappeared off the face of the earth. We don’t know exactly how much he received, but it’s in the hundreds of millions. And it will probably go over a billion because he also does now own a lot of Facebook stock. But on October 1st, the movie opened and that’s the day I met Eduardo. I got a phone call from our producer Scott Rudin that a representative for Eduardo had contacted him late at night. He wanted to see the movie. So we set up a private screening for him in New York right before Lady Gaga’s private screening. It’s true. I went to meet him when the movie was over and you could have performed surgery on him without anesthesia at that point in time. I gotta say, he was a deer in the headlights which is an understatement. He did certainly expect to like the movie a lot, but you could tell in his face that he had just relived the thing. It’s an unreasonable experience that hardly anybody, including myself, knows what it’s like to have a chapter from your life suddenly written, directed, lit, shot, and performed by actors. That was the first and only time I met Eduardo.

Deadline