Tag: 80’s

1983 – 40 Best Albums – Pazz and Jop Poll

The 1983 Pazz & Jop Critics Poll
Albums
1. Michael Jackson: Thriller
2. REM: Murmur
3. Talking Heads: Speaking in Tongues
4. X: More Fun in the New World
5. The Police: Synchronicity
6. U2: War
7. Lou Reed: Legendary Hearts
8. Johnathan Richman & the Modern Lovers: Jonathan Sings!
9. Richard Thompson: Hand of Kindness
10. Bob Dylan: Infidels
11. Elvis Costello: Punch the Clock
12. Culture Club: Colour By Numbers
13. Randy Newman: Trouble in Paradise
14. George Clinton: Computer Games
15. Big Country: The Crossing
16. Jerry Lee Lewis: The Sun Sessions
17. Aztec Camera: High Land, Hard Rain
18. T-Bone Burnett: Proof Through the Night
19. David Bowie: Let’s Dance
20. James Blood Ulmer: Odyssey
21. Rolling Stones: Undercover
22. The Blasters: Non Fiction
23. New Order: Power, Corruption and Lies
24. Malcolm McLaren: Duck Rock
25. Prince: 1999
26. Violent Femmes: Violent Femmes
27. Was (Not Was): Born to Laugh at Tornadoes
28. Graham Parker: The Real Macaw
29. Marshall Crenshaw: Field Day
30. The Replacements: Hootenanny
31. Eurythmics: Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)
32. Tom Waits: Swordfishtrombones
33. Eddy Grant: Killer on the Rampage
34. Trio: Trio and Error
35. Kid Creole and the Coconuts: Doppelganger
36. The Fleshtones: Hexbreaker
37. Linda Ronstadt: What’s New
38. King Sunny Adé and His African Beats: Synchro System
39. Nile Rodgers: Adventures in the Land of the Good Groove
40. Paul Simon: Hearts and Bones

Everyday is Like Sunday – Morrissey

“Everyday Is Like Sunday” is the third track of Morrissey’s debut solo album, Viva Hate, and the second single to be released by the artist. While the lyric was written by Morrissey, the song’s composer was Stephen Street. The lyric is reportedly inspired by Nevil Shute’s novel On the Beach,  about a group of people waiting for nuclear devastation in Melbourne, Australia.

Wikipedia

MISC:
November 10th 2017 – Morrissey Day in Los Angles

LOS ANGELES DECLARES MORRISSEY DAY

LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles City Council declared Friday, November 10th “Morrissey Day” in Los Angeles, California. During today’s council meeting, Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez introduced the resolution, which includes an official commemorative certificate presentation at the first of two sold-out Hollywood Bowl shows this Friday night.

Morrissey Day honors the man who put the ‘M’ in Moz Angeles, an icon whose music continues to touch and uplift countless people across the globe,” said Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez. “Morrissey uses his voice to raise awareness for many social issues while ‘in his own strange way,’ always staying true to his fans.”

“Los Angeles embraces individuality, compassion, and creativity, and Morrissey expresses those values in a way that moves Angelenos of all ages,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “Morrissey Day celebrates an artist whose music has captivated and inspired generations of people who may not always fit in — because they were born to stand out.”

https://monicarodriguez.org/news/press-release-los-angeles-declares-morrissey-day

Rasberry Beret – Warren Zevon – Letterman

Warren Zevon from 1990, on Letterman, playing a Prince Song that was featured on his new album, entitled Hindu Love Gods (which was also the name of his new band, formed with REM minus Michael Stipe).

I never saw Zevon in concert, alas, but I did see him at the Free Lisl rally at the Denver Capitol. This was a random thing. I just happened to be in the neighborhood when they were having the rally and I stopped to check it out.

Free Lisl: Fear & Loathing in Denver explores the most significant achievement of Hunter S. Thompson’s last years-the freeing of Lisl Auman who was sentenced to life without parole at the age of 21 for the murder of a Denver police officer by someone she had just met while she was handcuffed in the back of a police car. After receiving a letter from Lisl while she was in prison in 2001, Thompson enlisted the support of the nation’s top criminal defense lawyers, held a rally on the steps of the Colorado State Capitol and co-wrote an article for Vanity Fair subtitled “Lynching in Denver”-all in an attempt to free Lisl from a life sentence in prison. In March 2005, two weeks after Thompson committed suicide, the Colorado Supreme Court effectively set her free by reversing her conviction and ordering a retrial. A plea bargain leaves her on parole for many years to come, but Lisl is out of prison and appears for the first time in Free Lisl, not to argue her case, but to thank Hunter Thompson. Also appearing in Free Lisl are Warren Zevon who sings “Lawyers, Guns, and Money” from the Capitol steps, presidential historian Douglas Brinkley and Denver journalists, including Jeff Kass of the Rocky Mountain News, Diane Carmen of the Denver Post and Juliet Whitman of Westword, who examine the role the Denver press played in first indicting Lisl and then helping to free her.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0903616/

Oblivious – Aztec Camera

From the mountain tops down to the sunny street
A different drum is playing a different kind of beat
It’s like a mystery that never ends
I see you crying and I want to kill your friends

I hear your footsteps in the street
It won’t be long before we meet
It’s obvious
Just count me in and count me out and
I’ll be waiting for the shout
Oblivious

Met Mo and she’s okay, said no one really changed
Got different badges but they wear them just the same
Down by the ballroom I recognized
That flaming fountain in those kindred caring eyes.

I hear your footsteps in the street
It won’t be long before we meet
It’s obvious
Just count me in and count me out and
I’ll be waiting for the shout
Oblivious

Aztec Camera were a Scottish pop/new wave band formed by Roddy Frame, the group’s singer, songwriter, and only consistent member. Formed in 1980, Aztec Camera released a total of six albums: High Land, Hard Rain (1983), Knife (1984), Love (1987), Stray (1990), Dreamland (1993) and Frestonia (1995). The band garnered popular success for the songs “Oblivious”, “Somewhere in My Heart” and “Good Morning Britain” (a duet with former Clash guitarist Mick Jones).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aztec_Camera

Whip It – Devo

Crack that whip
Give the past a slip
Step on a crack
Break your mama’s back

When a problem comes along
You must whip it
Before the cream sits out too long
You must whip it
When something’s going wrong
You must whip it

Now whip it
Into shape
Shape it up
Get straight
Go forward
Move ahead
Try to detect it
It’s not too late
To whip it
Whip it good

When a good time turns around
You must whip it
You will never live it down
Unless you whip it
No one gets away
Until they whip it

I say whip it
Whip it good
I say whip it
Whip it good

Crack that whip
Give the past a slip
Step on a crack
Break your mama’s back

When a problem comes along
You must whip it
Before the cream sits out too long
You must whip it
When something’s going wrong
You must whip it

Now whip it
Into shape
Shape it up
Get straight
Go forward
Move ahead
Try to detect it
It’s not too late
To whip it
Into shape
Shape it up
Get straight
Go forward
Move ahead
Try to detect it

It’s not too late
To whip it
Whip it good

“Whip It” is a song by American rock band Devo from their third album Freedom of Choice (1980). It is a new wave and synth-pop song that features a synthesizer, electric guitar, bass guitar, and drums in its instrumentation. The apparently nonsensical lyrics have a common theme revolving around the ability to deal with one’s problems by “whipping it”. Co-written by bassist Gerald Casale and singer Mark Mothersbaugh, Devo recorded “Whip It” with producer Robert Margouleff at the Record Plant in Los Angeles.

Although “Whip It” was released as the second single from Freedom of Choice, Warner Bros. Records did not expect it to be a hit, due to its nonstandard tempo and strange lyrics. The disc jockey Kal Rudman took an interest in the song and it was soon being played on several radio stations in the Southeastern United States. Peaking at number 14 on the Billboard Hot 100, “Whip It” became a hit single and found chart success in several countries. Mothersbaugh believes the song sold well because some people assumed the lyrics are about masturbation or sadomasochism.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whip_It_(Devo_song)

Albums of the Year 1984 – Pazz & Jop Critics Poll –

https://www.robertchristgau.com/xg/pnj/pjres84.php

1. Bruce Springsteen: Born in the U.S.A. (Columbia)
2. Prince and the Revolution: Purple Rain (Warner Bros.)
3. Los Lobos: How Will the Wolf Survive? (Slash)
4. The Replacements: Let It Be (Twin/Tone)
5. Tina Turner: Private Dancer (Capitol)
6. R.E.M.: Reckoning (I.R.S.)
7. The Pretenders: Learning to Crawl (Sire)
8. Hüsker Dü: Zen Arcade (SST)
9. Lou Reed: New Sensations (RCA Victor)
10. Run-D.M.C.: Run-D.M.C. (Profile)
11. Cyndi Lauper: She’s So Unusual (Portrait ’83)
12. Bangles: All Over the Place (Columbia)
13. Ramones: Too Tough to Die (Sire)
14. Minutemen: Double Nickels on the Dime (SST)
15. The dB’s: Like This (Bearsville)
16. Womack & Womack: Love Wars (Elektra ’83)
17. Laurie Anderson: Mister Heartbreak (Warner Bros.)
18. Rubén Blades y Seis del Solar: Buscando America (Elektra)
19. Laurie Anderson: United States Live (Warner Bros.)
20. Meat Puppets: Meat Puppets II (SST)
21. Neville Brothers: Neville-ization (Black Top)
22. The Smiths: The Smiths (Sire)
23. Let’s Active: Cypress (I.R.S.)
24. Tom Verlaine: Cover (Warner Bros.)
25. Van Halen: 1984 (Warner Bros.)
26. Del-Lords: Frontier Days (EMI America)
27. Linton Kwesi Johnson: Making History (Island)
28. George Clinton: You Shouldn’t-Nuf Bit Fish (Capitol ’83)
29. U2: The Unforgettable Fire (Island)
30. King Sunny Ade and His African Beats: Aura (Island)
31. Talking Heads: Stop Making Sense (Sire)
32. ZZ Top: Eliminator (Warner Bros.)
33. Peter Wolf: Lights Out (EMI America)
34. The Gospel at Colonus (Warner Bros.)
35. Lyres: On Fyre (Ace of Hearts)
36. The Everly Brothers: EB 84 (Mercury)
37. P. Funk All-Stars: Urban Dancefloor Guerillas (CBS Associated/Uncle Jam ’83)
38. Del Fuegos: The Longest Day (Slash)
39. The Special AKA: In the Studio (Chrysalis)
40. Rickie Lee Jones: The Magazine (Warner Bros.)

*Includes 1983 votes: Lauper 83 (7); Womack & Womack 36 (4); Clinton 83 (8); ZZ Top 90 (9); P. Funk All-Stars 57 (6).

This poll compiles ballots from 240 critics, each of whom divided 100 points among 10 1984 LP’s. Maximum points per album: 30. Minimum: 5. Points determined placement, with total mentions (indicated in parentheses) used to break ties.