Tag: 80’s

Addicted to Love – Robert Palmer

JOHN TAYLOR: Robert Palmer wasn’t comfortable doing videos. “Addicted to Love” exemplified how he felt about it—it’s a video commenting on itself. He’s making fun of it. He didn’t really step outside of that. He did “I Didn’t Mean to Turn You On” and “Simply Irresistible,” and they’re both variations on “Addicted to Love.” He was a bit too old and self-conscious by the time videos became important.

JULIA BOLINO: Robert Palmer was very polite, very professional. His wife was there, so perhaps he had no choice.

MAK GILCHRIST: None of us felt we were being exploited in that video. That was a shock to me, when people said the video was demeaning to women. I thought the opposite; I thought we looked strong and quite scary.

I Want My MTV
Tannenbaum, Rob; Marks, Craig.

1983 – 40 Best Albums – Pazz and Jop Poll

The 1983 Pazz & Jop Critics Poll
Albums
1. Michael Jackson: Thriller
2. REM: Murmur
3. Talking Heads: Speaking in Tongues
4. X: More Fun in the New World
5. The Police: Synchronicity
6. U2: War
7. Lou Reed: Legendary Hearts
8. Johnathan Richman & the Modern Lovers: Jonathan Sings!
9. Richard Thompson: Hand of Kindness
10. Bob Dylan: Infidels
11. Elvis Costello: Punch the Clock
12. Culture Club: Colour By Numbers
13. Randy Newman: Trouble in Paradise
14. George Clinton: Computer Games
15. Big Country: The Crossing
16. Jerry Lee Lewis: The Sun Sessions
17. Aztec Camera: High Land, Hard Rain
18. T-Bone Burnett: Proof Through the Night
19. David Bowie: Let’s Dance
20. James Blood Ulmer: Odyssey
21. Rolling Stones: Undercover
22. The Blasters: Non Fiction
23. New Order: Power, Corruption and Lies
24. Malcolm McLaren: Duck Rock
25. Prince: 1999
26. Violent Femmes: Violent Femmes
27. Was (Not Was): Born to Laugh at Tornadoes
28. Graham Parker: The Real Macaw
29. Marshall Crenshaw: Field Day
30. The Replacements: Hootenanny
31. Eurythmics: Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)
32. Tom Waits: Swordfishtrombones
33. Eddy Grant: Killer on the Rampage
34. Trio: Trio and Error
35. Kid Creole and the Coconuts: Doppelganger
36. The Fleshtones: Hexbreaker
37. Linda Ronstadt: What’s New
38. King Sunny Adé and His African Beats: Synchro System
39. Nile Rodgers: Adventures in the Land of the Good Groove
40. Paul Simon: Hearts and Bones

Everyday is Like Sunday – Morrissey

“Everyday Is Like Sunday” is the third track of Morrissey’s debut solo album, Viva Hate, and the second single to be released by the artist. While the lyric was written by Morrissey, the song’s composer was Stephen Street. The lyric is reportedly inspired by Nevil Shute’s novel On the Beach,  about a group of people waiting for nuclear devastation in Melbourne, Australia.

Wikipedia

MISC:
November 10th 2017 – Morrissey Day in Los Angles

LOS ANGELES DECLARES MORRISSEY DAY

LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles City Council declared Friday, November 10th “Morrissey Day” in Los Angeles, California. During today’s council meeting, Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez introduced the resolution, which includes an official commemorative certificate presentation at the first of two sold-out Hollywood Bowl shows this Friday night.

Morrissey Day honors the man who put the ‘M’ in Moz Angeles, an icon whose music continues to touch and uplift countless people across the globe,” said Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez. “Morrissey uses his voice to raise awareness for many social issues while ‘in his own strange way,’ always staying true to his fans.”

“Los Angeles embraces individuality, compassion, and creativity, and Morrissey expresses those values in a way that moves Angelenos of all ages,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “Morrissey Day celebrates an artist whose music has captivated and inspired generations of people who may not always fit in — because they were born to stand out.”

https://monicarodriguez.org/news/press-release-los-angeles-declares-morrissey-day

Rasberry Beret – Warren Zevon – Letterman

Warren Zevon from 1990, on Letterman, playing a Prince Song that was featured on his new album, entitled Hindu Love Gods (which was also the name of his new band, formed with REM minus Michael Stipe).

I never saw Zevon in concert, alas, but I did see him at the Free Lisl rally at the Denver Capitol. This was a random thing. I just happened to be in the neighborhood when they were having the rally and I stopped to check it out.

Free Lisl: Fear & Loathing in Denver explores the most significant achievement of Hunter S. Thompson’s last years-the freeing of Lisl Auman who was sentenced to life without parole at the age of 21 for the murder of a Denver police officer by someone she had just met while she was handcuffed in the back of a police car. After receiving a letter from Lisl while she was in prison in 2001, Thompson enlisted the support of the nation’s top criminal defense lawyers, held a rally on the steps of the Colorado State Capitol and co-wrote an article for Vanity Fair subtitled “Lynching in Denver”-all in an attempt to free Lisl from a life sentence in prison. In March 2005, two weeks after Thompson committed suicide, the Colorado Supreme Court effectively set her free by reversing her conviction and ordering a retrial. A plea bargain leaves her on parole for many years to come, but Lisl is out of prison and appears for the first time in Free Lisl, not to argue her case, but to thank Hunter Thompson. Also appearing in Free Lisl are Warren Zevon who sings “Lawyers, Guns, and Money” from the Capitol steps, presidential historian Douglas Brinkley and Denver journalists, including Jeff Kass of the Rocky Mountain News, Diane Carmen of the Denver Post and Juliet Whitman of Westword, who examine the role the Denver press played in first indicting Lisl and then helping to free her.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0903616/