Tag: 80’s

It’s a Mistake – Men at Work

COLIN HAY, Men at Work: I think “Who Can It Be Now?” cost $5,000. Greg Ham, our sax player, had a theatrical background, and I loved to perform. We first came to the States towards the end of 1982, and toured for about four months. MTV was already playing “Who Can It Be Now?” in heavy rotation and may have been playing “Down Under” by the time we left. It was exciting enough for us to be in New York. But when I arrived, people would walk past me saying, “How you doin’, Colin?” People would hang out of cabs, yelling out stuff. And that was because of MTV.

Tannenbaum, Rob; Marks, Craig. I Want My MTV

Deadbeat Club – The B-52’s

The B-52s (styled as The B-52’s prior to 2008)[8] is an American new wave band formed in Athens, Georgia, in 1976. The original line-up consisted of Fred Schneider (vocals, percussion), Kate Pierson (vocals, keyboards, synth bass), Cindy Wilson (vocals, percussion), Ricky Wilson (guitar), and Keith Strickland (drums, guitar, keyboards). Ricky Wilson died from AIDS-related illness in 1985,[9] and Strickland switched from drums to lead guitar. The band also added various members for albums and live performances.

The group evoked a “thrift shop aesthetic”, in the words of Bernard Gendron,[7] by drawing from 1950s and 1960s pop sources, trash culture, and rock and roll. Schneider, Pierson, and Wilson sometimes use call-and-response-style vocals (Schneider’s often humorous sprechgesang contrasting with the melodic harmonies of Pierson and Wilson), and their guitar- and keyboard-driven instrumentation comprises their trademark sound, which was also set apart from their contemporaries by the unusual guitar tunings used by Ricky Wilson[10] on their earlier albums.

This is Radio Clash – The Clash

Interrupting all programs
This is radio clash from pirate satellite
Orbiting your living room,
Cashing in the bill of rights
Cuban army surplus or refusing all third lights
This is radio clash on pirate satellite

This sound does not subscribe
To the international plan
In the psycho shadow of the white right hand
Then that see ghettology as an urban Vietnam
Giving deadly exhibitions of murder by napalm

This is radio clash tearing up the seven veils
This is radio clash please save us, not the whales
This is radio clash underneath a mushroom cloud
This is radio clash
You don’t need that funeral shroud

Forces have been looting
My humanity
Curfews have been curbing
The end of liberty

Hands of law have sorted through
My identity
But now this sound is brave
And wants to be free, anyway to be free

This is radio clash on pirate satellite
This is not free Europe
Noh an armed force network
This is radio clash using audio ammunition
This is radio clash can we get that world to listen?
This is radio clash using aural ammunition
This is radio clash can we get that world to listen?
This is radio clash on pirate satellite
Orbiting your living room,
Cashing in the bill of rights
This is radio clash on pirate satellite
This is radio clash everybody hold on tight

A-riggy diggy dig dang dang
Go back to urban ‘nam

“This Is Radio Clash” is a song by the English punk rock band the Clash. The 1981 single was issued in 7-inch format and also in 12-inch format and cassette tape with additional tracks. The first public performance of the song was on Tom Snyder’s Tomorrow show on 5 June 1981.[3]

The song is not featured on any of the Clash’s original studio albums, but is included in their compilations: The Singles (1991), The Story of the Clash, Volume 1, Sound System, Singles Box, The Singles (2007) and Clash on Broadway.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_Is_Radio_Clash

Rio – Duran Duran

Her name is Rio and she dances on the sand
Just like that river twisting through a dusty land
And when she shines, she really shows you all she can
Oh Rio, Rio, dance across the Rio Grande

I’ve seen you on the beach and I’ve seen you on TV
Two of a billion stars, it means so much to me
Like a birthday or a pretty view
But then I’m sure that you know it’s just for you

Her name is Rio and she dances on the sand
Just like that river twisting through a dusty land
And when she shines, she really shows you all she can
Oh Rio, Rio, dance across the Rio Grande
Hey now, wooh, look at that, did she nearly run you down?
At the end of the drive, the lawmen arrive
You make me feel alive, alive, alive
I’ll take my chance, ’cause luck is on my side or something
I know what you’re thinking, I’ll tell you something, I know what you’re thinking

Her name is Rio and she dances on the sand
Just like that river twists across a dusty land
And when she shines, she really shows you all she can
Oh Rio, Rio, dance across the Rio Grande

Her name is Rio, she don’t need to understand
And I might find her if I’m looking like I can
Oh Rio, Rio, hear them shout across the land
From mountains in the north down to the Rio Grande

Duran Duran are an English new wave band formed in Birmingham in 1978. The group were a leading band in the MTV-driven Second British Invasion of the US in the 1980s. The group was formed by keyboardist Nick Rhodes and bassist John Taylor, with the later addition of drummer Roger Taylor, and after numerous personnel changes, guitarist Andy Taylor (none of the Taylors are related) and lead singer Simon Le Bon. These five members featured the most commercially successful line-up.

Wikipedia

Pass the Dutchie – Musical Youth

Musical Youth are a British Jamaican reggae band formed in 1979 in Birmingham, England. They are best remembered for their successful 1982 single “Pass the Dutchie”, which became a No. 1 hit around the world. The band recorded two studio albums, and released a number of successful singles throughout 1982 and 1983, including a collaboration with Donna Summer in “Unconditional Love”.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_Youth

From the youtube comments:
Gropiaf
“There’s a common misconception that Musical Youth’s number one hit in 1982, Pass the Dutchie, is a song about cannabis, when in fact the song is about extreme poverty; the ‘dutchie’ in the lyrics refers to a type of pot used for cooking. It’s an easy mistake to make though because the song Pass the Dutchie is actually a cover version of a song released just one year earlier called Pass the Koutchie by the Mighty Diamonds, which was indeed a song all about cannabis.”