Tag: Video

Ice Ice Baby – Vanilla Ice – The Annotated Vanilla Ice

“Ice Ice Baby” is a hip hop song by American rapper Vanilla Ice, and DJ Earthquake. It was based on the bassline of “Under Pressure” by British rock band Queen and British singer David Bowie, who did not receive songwriting credit or royalties until after it had become a hit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_Ice_Baby

Singles can be rough going, especially very popular ones. It’s often hard to admit that you were one of the eight billion people who streamed “Gangnam Style” at its hottest. That’s how irony culture works. My biggest records in DJ sets now are “Ice Ice Baby” and “U Can’t Touch This,” and I wouldn’t have dared play them at any hip-hop cred party twenty years ago. All the songs I spin for ironic purposes are now legit parts of people’s enjoyment.

Music Is History
Questlove

An anachronistic corruption of the phrase “word to the mother”, which was a popular reference to Africa or “The Motherland” during the late 1980s Afrocentric movement. While the replacement of “the” with “your” effectively obliterated the term’s Afrocentric roots, it continued to be used in the same manner, that is, to express agreement. Alternatively, the “your” could take on sinister connotations, implying that speaker was sexually intimate with the listener’s mother, as in “say hi to your mom for me“, or, in keeping with the whack terminology, “props to your mom, she’s da bomb”. Finally, the phrase might mean nothing at all, and be used to ineptly feign street cred, in the style of Vanilla Ice.

Lithium – Nirvana

On the simplicity of Nirvana’s music
I think that’s one of the reasons why it’s proved to be so effective. The guitar playing is very simple. The drumming is very simple. … We would record a song in one or two takes. It was very pure and honest and real. And I think when Kurt wrote songs, he really tried to capture that simplicity because he realized that that’s kind of a direct route to someone’s heart or soul or mind.

On Cobain fluctuating between being fun and reclusive
When I moved up and started living in that small apartment with them, I mean, this was someone that I had never met before. I didn’t know at first — I thought, maybe he’s quiet, maybe he’s shy, maybe he has social anxieties, whatever it is. There were times, too, where he was outrageously funny and really fun to be around. The two of us would get $7 and go to the grocery store and spend half an hour in the freezer section looking for the perfect TV dinner. And those moments were so much fun. So it wasn’t always doom and gloom. …

A lot of the times when we’d go to the apartment after rehearsal, I slept on the couch, so I would kind of get on my couch and he would go in his room, close the door. Little did I know that most of that time he was writing in his journals, and more often than not, the next day at rehearsal, he would have a new song. So I think he had moments of being introverted and sort of reclusive, but that was also balanced with someone that was pretty fun to be around and pretty great to be in a band with, because when we counted into a song, it exploded, and it was real, man, it was real.

Dave Grohl retraces his life-affirming path from Nirvana to Foo Fighters
Fresh Air, NPR

Everyday is Like Sunday – Morrissey

“Everyday Is Like Sunday” is the third track of Morrissey’s debut solo album, Viva Hate, and the second single to be released by the artist. While the lyric was written by Morrissey, the song’s composer was Stephen Street. The lyric is reportedly inspired by Nevil Shute’s novel On the Beach,  about a group of people waiting for nuclear devastation in Melbourne, Australia.

Wikipedia

MISC:
November 10th 2017 – Morrissey Day in Los Angles

LOS ANGELES DECLARES MORRISSEY DAY

LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles City Council declared Friday, November 10th “Morrissey Day” in Los Angeles, California. During today’s council meeting, Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez introduced the resolution, which includes an official commemorative certificate presentation at the first of two sold-out Hollywood Bowl shows this Friday night.

Morrissey Day honors the man who put the ‘M’ in Moz Angeles, an icon whose music continues to touch and uplift countless people across the globe,” said Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez. “Morrissey uses his voice to raise awareness for many social issues while ‘in his own strange way,’ always staying true to his fans.”

“Los Angeles embraces individuality, compassion, and creativity, and Morrissey expresses those values in a way that moves Angelenos of all ages,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “Morrissey Day celebrates an artist whose music has captivated and inspired generations of people who may not always fit in — because they were born to stand out.”

https://monicarodriguez.org/news/press-release-los-angeles-declares-morrissey-day

Walk on the Wild Side

“Walk on the Wild Side” is a song by Lou Reed from his second solo album, Transformer (1972). It was produced by David Bowie and Mick Ronson and released as a double A-side with “Perfect Day”. Known as a counterculture anthem, the song received wide radio coverage and became Reed’s biggest hit and signature song despite touching on taboo topics such as transgender people, drugs, male prostitution, and oral sex.

The song’s lyrics, describing a series of individuals and their journeys to New York City, refer to several of the regular “superstars” at Andy Warhol’s New York studio, the Factory; the song mentions Holly Woodlawn, Candy Darling, Joe Dallesandro, Jackie Curtis and Joe Campbell (referred to in the song by the nickname “Sugar Plum Fairy”).

In 2013, The New York Times described “Walk on the Wild Side” as a “ballad of misfits and oddballs” that “became an unlikely cultural anthem, a siren song luring generations of people…to a New York so long forgotten as to seem imaginary”. In 2010, Rolling Stone ranked “Walk on the Wild Side” at number 223 in its list of the 500 greatest songs of all time.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walk_on_the_Wild_Side_(Lou_Reed_song)

Rasberry Beret – Warren Zevon – Letterman

Warren Zevon from 1990, on Letterman, playing a Prince Song that was featured on his new album, entitled Hindu Love Gods (which was also the name of his new band, formed with REM minus Michael Stipe).

I never saw Zevon in concert, alas, but I did see him at the Free Lisl rally at the Denver Capitol. This was a random thing. I just happened to be in the neighborhood when they were having the rally and I stopped to check it out.

Free Lisl: Fear & Loathing in Denver explores the most significant achievement of Hunter S. Thompson’s last years-the freeing of Lisl Auman who was sentenced to life without parole at the age of 21 for the murder of a Denver police officer by someone she had just met while she was handcuffed in the back of a police car. After receiving a letter from Lisl while she was in prison in 2001, Thompson enlisted the support of the nation’s top criminal defense lawyers, held a rally on the steps of the Colorado State Capitol and co-wrote an article for Vanity Fair subtitled “Lynching in Denver”-all in an attempt to free Lisl from a life sentence in prison. In March 2005, two weeks after Thompson committed suicide, the Colorado Supreme Court effectively set her free by reversing her conviction and ordering a retrial. A plea bargain leaves her on parole for many years to come, but Lisl is out of prison and appears for the first time in Free Lisl, not to argue her case, but to thank Hunter Thompson. Also appearing in Free Lisl are Warren Zevon who sings “Lawyers, Guns, and Money” from the Capitol steps, presidential historian Douglas Brinkley and Denver journalists, including Jeff Kass of the Rocky Mountain News, Diane Carmen of the Denver Post and Juliet Whitman of Westword, who examine the role the Denver press played in first indicting Lisl and then helping to free her.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0903616/

Oblivious – Aztec Camera

From the mountain tops down to the sunny street
A different drum is playing a different kind of beat
It’s like a mystery that never ends
I see you crying and I want to kill your friends

I hear your footsteps in the street
It won’t be long before we meet
It’s obvious
Just count me in and count me out and
I’ll be waiting for the shout
Oblivious

Met Mo and she’s okay, said no one really changed
Got different badges but they wear them just the same
Down by the ballroom I recognized
That flaming fountain in those kindred caring eyes.

I hear your footsteps in the street
It won’t be long before we meet
It’s obvious
Just count me in and count me out and
I’ll be waiting for the shout
Oblivious

Aztec Camera were a Scottish pop/new wave band formed by Roddy Frame, the group’s singer, songwriter, and only consistent member. Formed in 1980, Aztec Camera released a total of six albums: High Land, Hard Rain (1983), Knife (1984), Love (1987), Stray (1990), Dreamland (1993) and Frestonia (1995). The band garnered popular success for the songs “Oblivious”, “Somewhere in My Heart” and “Good Morning Britain” (a duet with former Clash guitarist Mick Jones).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aztec_Camera

Wicked Game – Chris Isaak

“Wicked Game” is a song by American rock musician Chris Isaak, released from his third studio album Heart Shaped World (1989). Despite being released as a single in 1989, it did not become a hit until it was featured in the 1990 David Lynch film Wild at Heart. Lee Chesnut, an Atlanta radio station music director who loved David Lynch films, began playing the song, and it quickly became an American top-ten hit in January 1991, reaching number six on the Billboard Hot 100, making it the first hit song of Isaak’s career. Additionally, the single became a number-one hit in Belgium and reached the top 10 in several other nations.

Wikipedia

What would you have liked to have been, if you hadn’t been a professional musician?
I’ve worked in a funeral home, did roofing jobs, drove delivery and spent time working the docks of Stockton, California, unloading ships. None of it was near as much fun and I didn’t get to wear a sequined suit…

Have you learned anything new about songwriting, interviewing your guests for the show?
Glen Campbell told me “stay out of the way of a good song.” I think it’s true. If a song’s good, don’t overdo it.

CHRIS ISAAK: On Record
American Songwriter

Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood – Soundtrack

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Once_Upon_a_Time_in_Hollywood#Soundtrack

Once Upon A Time In Hollywood (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) – Exclusive Limited Edition Orange Colored Vinyl LP (Includes 2 Posters)

Roy Head & The Traits–Treat Her Right
The Bob Seger System*–Ramblin’ Gamblin’ Man
No Artist–Boss Radio
Featuring – Humble Harve*
Deep Purple–Hush
No Artist–Mug Root Beer Advertisement
The Village Callers–Hector
Buchanan Brothers (2)–Son Of A Lovin’ Man
Chad & Jeremy–Paxton Quigley’s Had The Course
No Artist–Tanya’s Tanning Butter Advertisement
Paul Revere & The Raiders–Good Thing
Paul Revere & The Raiders–Hungry
Box Tops–Choo Choo Train
Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels–Jenny Take A Ride
Deep Purple–Kentucky Woman
Buffy Sainte-Marie–The Circle Game
No Artist–Boss Radio
Featuring – The Real Don Steele*
Simon & Garfunkel–Mrs. Robinson
No Artist–Numero Uno Advertisement
Los Bravos–Bring A Little Lovin’
No Artist–Suddenly / Heaven Sent Advertisement
No Artist–Vagabond High School Reunion
No Artist–KHJ Los Angeles Weather Report
No Artist–The Illustrated Man Advertisement / Ready For Action
Dee Clark–Hey Little Girl
No Artist–Summer Blonde Advertisement
Neil Diamond–Brother Love’s Traveling Salvation Show
Robert Corff–Don’t Chase Me Around
Paul Revere & The Raiders–Mr. Sun, Mr. Moon
José Feliciano–California Dreamin’
I Cantori Moderni di Alessandroni–Dynamite Jim (English Version)
Vanilla Fudge–You Keep Me Hangin’ On (Quentin Tarantino Edit)
Maurice Jarre–Miss Lilly Langtry
No Artist–KHJ Batman Promotion

It’s a Mistake – Men at Work

COLIN HAY, Men at Work: I think “Who Can It Be Now?” cost $5,000. Greg Ham, our sax player, had a theatrical background, and I loved to perform. We first came to the States towards the end of 1982, and toured for about four months. MTV was already playing “Who Can It Be Now?” in heavy rotation and may have been playing “Down Under” by the time we left. It was exciting enough for us to be in New York. But when I arrived, people would walk past me saying, “How you doin’, Colin?” People would hang out of cabs, yelling out stuff. And that was because of MTV.

Tannenbaum, Rob; Marks, Craig. I Want My MTV

Deadbeat Club – The B-52’s

The B-52s (styled as The B-52’s prior to 2008)[8] is an American new wave band formed in Athens, Georgia, in 1976. The original line-up consisted of Fred Schneider (vocals, percussion), Kate Pierson (vocals, keyboards, synth bass), Cindy Wilson (vocals, percussion), Ricky Wilson (guitar), and Keith Strickland (drums, guitar, keyboards). Ricky Wilson died from AIDS-related illness in 1985,[9] and Strickland switched from drums to lead guitar. The band also added various members for albums and live performances.

The group evoked a “thrift shop aesthetic”, in the words of Bernard Gendron,[7] by drawing from 1950s and 1960s pop sources, trash culture, and rock and roll. Schneider, Pierson, and Wilson sometimes use call-and-response-style vocals (Schneider’s often humorous sprechgesang contrasting with the melodic harmonies of Pierson and Wilson), and their guitar- and keyboard-driven instrumentation comprises their trademark sound, which was also set apart from their contemporaries by the unusual guitar tunings used by Ricky Wilson[10] on their earlier albums.