Tag: 1990s

Slacker – Quotes from

Old Man: When young, we mourn for one woman… as we grow old, for women in general. The tragedy of life is that man is never free yet strives for what he can never be. The thing most feared in secret always happens. My life, my loves, where are they now? But the more the pain grows, the more this instinct for life somehow asserts itself. The necessary beauty in life is in giving yourself to it completely. Only later will it clarify itself and become coherent.

Video Backpacker: To me, my thing is, a video image is much more powerful and useful than an actual event. Like back when I used to go out, when I was last out, I was walking down the street and this guy, that came barreling out of a bar, fell right in front of me, and he had a knife right in his back, landed right on the ground and… Well, I have no reference to it now. I can’t put it on pause. I can’t put it on slow mo and see all the little details. And the blood, it was all wrong. It didn’t look like blood. The hue was off. I couldn’t adjust the hue. I was seeing it for real, but it just wasn’t right. And I didn’t even see the knife impact on the body. I missed that part.

Old Anarchist: And remember: the passion for destruction is also a creative passion.

Working on Same Painting: Sorry, I’m late.

Having a Breakthrough Day: That’s okay, time doesn’t exist.

IMDB

Presents a day in the life in Austin, Texas among its social outcasts and misfits, predominantly the twenty-something set, using a series of linear vignettes. These characters, who in some manner just don’t fit into the establishment norms, move seamlessly from one scene to the next, randomly coming and going into one another’s lives. Highlights include a UFO buff who adamantly insists that the U.S. has been on the moon since the 1950s, a woman who produces a glass slide purportedly of Madonna’s pap smear, and an old anarchist who sympathetically shares his philosophy of life with a robber.

Stutter – Elastica


No need to whine boy
Like a wind up toy you stutter at my feet
And it’s never the time boy
You’ve had too much wine to stumble up my street
Well it isn’t a problem
Nothing we can’t keep between the sheets
Tell me you’re mine love
And I will not wait for other bedtime treats

Is there something you lack
When I’m flat on my back
Is there something that I can do for you?
It’s always something you hate
Or it’s something you ate
Tell me is it the way that I touch you?
Have you found a new mate
And is she really great
Is it just that I’m much too much for you?

Don’t feed me a line boy
I can hear that voice you use upon the phone
And there’s no need to be coy
That is something you can do upon your own
Well it isn’t a problem
Nothing we can’t solve so just relax
Am I on the wrong train love
And will I have to tie you to the tracks

Is there something you lack
When I’m flat on my back
Is there something that I can do for you?
It’s always something you hate
Or it’s something you ate
Tell me is it the way that I touch you?
Have you found a new mate
And is she really great
Is it just that I’m much too much for you?

I really want you to
I really want you to

Highest Grossing Films of 1990

Highest-grossing films of 1990

1 Ghost Paramount $505,702,588
2 Home Alone Fox $476,684,675
3 Pretty Woman Disney $463,406,268
4 Dances with Wolves Orion $424,208,848
5 Total Recall Sony / Carolco $261,317,921
6 Back to the Future Part III Universal $244,527,583
7 Die Hard 2 Fox $240,031,094
8 Presumed Innocent Warner Bros. $221,303,188
9 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles New Line $201,965,915
10 Kindergarten Cop Universal $201,957,688

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1990_in_film#Highest-grossing_films

Seattle – Mid 1990’s

I think these are from March 95. Taken on film, with a Pentax K1000. They are a bit faded.

Fun fact – While in Seattle I got a free espresso for knowing the answer to this:
Q: What was the real first name of Lolita, from the book Lolita?
A: Dolores

From the book:
“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta. She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita.”