Tag: California

California Exiles and the Housing Crisis

But there is another factor at play: Californians, fleeing high home prices, are moving to Idaho in droves. For the past several years, Idaho has been one of the fastest-growing states, with the largest share of new residents coming from California. This fact can be illustrated with census data, moving vans — or resentment.

Home prices rose 20 percent in 2020, according to Zillow, and in Boise, “Go Back to California” graffiti has been sprayed along the highways. The last election cycle was a referendum on growth and housing, and included a fringe mayoral candidate who campaigned on a promise to keep Californians out. The dichotomy between growth and its discontents has fused the city’s politics and collective consciousness with a question that city leaders around the country were asking even before the pandemic and remote work trends accelerated relocation: Is it possible to import California’s growth without also importing its housing problems?

“I can’t point to a city that has done it right,” said Lauren McLean, Boise’s Democratic mayor.

That’s because as bad as California’s affordable housing problem is, it isn’t really a California problem. It is a national one. From rising homelessness to anti-development sentiment to frustration among middle-class workers who’ve been locked out of the housing market, the same set of housing issues has bubbled up in cities across the country. They’ve already visited Boise, NashvilleDenver and Austin, Texas, and many other high-growth cities. And they will become even more widespread as remote workers move around.

NYTIMES

Baywatch Goes Meta – Rescue Bay

Summary: When TV-producer Don Brand visits the beach, he is delighted to discover that the actions that take place on the beach are perfect for a TV-series. He calls the TV-series “Rescue Bay”. He gets inspired when he witness Stephanie, Matt and Summer rescue two men on a boat, and when Garner catches a bad guy with the help of a kid’s kite. Brand is convinced that he has a number one show in his hand.

Brand follows the lifeguards around interviewing them about their jobs and personal lives. Stephanie reveals her and Mitch’s relationship to him. Matt and Summer are played by two network-deal ingenues. Stephanie wants to play herself but when C.J. returns from Hawaii unaware of the shooting of a TV-series, she rescues the victims not knowing they are only acting. Brand is immediately smitten and offers Stephanie’s part to C.J. and Stephanie becomes real upset. When the two roommates argue over who is best suited to play the role, Mitch agrees to help them with a kissing scene, but that doesn’t change anything.

The character based on Mitch is played by a bodybuilder named Dolph Apolganger. Garner is played by an actor named Sly Hutchinson who could be Garner’s identical twin. The series pilot is supposed to be a fifteen-minute series presentation. In the end, Garner ends up stealing Sly’s girlfriend Dawn.

The opening action sequence features a boat explosion, but when the explosion is too big, the real lifeguards have to make a big rescue. Brand films the whole rescue and when Mitch returns from the water, he orders Brand to leave the beach. When the Baywatch gang have watched the clip Brand showed the network, Mitch reveals to everyone that the network didn’t like the idea, although they will sell it to foreign countries and the States will send it in syndication.

Metacritic

C.J. Parker: It just so happens that I can act! I played Medea in high school!

Lt. Stephanie Holden: Oh yeah? Well, I played Medea in college!

Don Brand: Hey come on, wouldn’t you rather cooperate and have an accurate portrayal of lifeguards in action?

Lt. Stephanie Holden: Come on yourself, you’re talking about television!

IMDB

Affordable housing can cost $1 million per unit in California

Affordable housing can cost $1 million per unit in California due to is California’s labyrinthine financing process, parking minimums, and local governments forcing developers to cut number of apartments per building from urbanplanning

Lazerus42
My home town West Los Angeles is terrible at this. Parking is atrocious, and so is the ability to rezone single resident to multi floor apartments, or even apartment complex. We understandably don’t allow new developements to happen without built in parking now, but that then creates a city of high end apartments being the only thing people want to develop. So parking is a stigma of the issues. Of course public transportation is big for many metropolises, but LA is big, like big big. Public transportation is good, but bad in LA.. lots of NIMBY stopping the way. (look at trying to pass a trolley line near Beverly Hills High School) So this leads to a realm of housing that is damn near impossible to afford. I don’t quite know what to do. I’m not an expert in any way. It’s just what I’ve come to understand is the issue.

wizardnamehere
The cause is a lack of public transport. But transport projects are rendered unviable by the large ownership and preference to cars. You have to tackle the issue from both ends. You also need planning policy which aims to reduce total trips taken outside the local area. —

Lack of Housing and Overcrowding in Silicon Valley

From the early outbreaks to the economic destruction that has come after, the coronavirus pandemic has mapped itself onto America’s longstanding affordable housing problem and the gaping inequality that underlies it. To offset rising rents in a nation where one in four tenant households spend more than half of their pretax income on shelter, a multitude of low-wage service workers have piled into ever more crowded homes

San Francisco, there is a rough economic split. Cities and neighborhoods to the east, places like East Palo Alto, North Fair Oaks and the Belle Haven section of Menlo Park, are more overcrowded and have a larger share of low-income and Black and Latino residents, many of whom have been disproportionately affected by the virus. Towns and neighborhoods to the west, places like Hillsborough and Palo Alto, are whiter and rich.

This geography is as fundamental to how the place operates as the invention of the microchip. Every day, throngs of clerks, landscapers and elder-care workers wake up on the eastern parts and travel to homes on the western parts or to the corporate campuses of tech companies to do subcontracting work. And every night, they return to overcrowded homes.

12 People in a 3-Bedroom House, Then the Virus Entered the Equation
Overcrowding, not density, has defined many coronavirus hot spots. Service workers’ quarters skirting Silicon Valley are no exception.
Conor Dougherty
NYTIMES

The Fight for Housing in California

In California, more than 100,000 people sleep on the streets. The tent cities in Los Angeles’s skid row have distinct neighborhoods, and across from a homelessness center, the bodies on the sidewalk are four rows deep. Trailers line the streets near Google’s Mountain View headquarters, and in Modesto, a woman sleeping in a cardboard box was crushed to death by a front loader that came to clear her encampment away.

Francesca Mari, NY Times
Review of:
GOLDEN GATES
Fighting for Housing in America
By Conor Dougherty

California Poverty Highest in Nation

Mr. Newsom campaigned on a promise to usher in reforms that would lead to the construction of 3.5 million housing units by 2025. That output would be more than quadruple the current rate, and the governor has started referring to it as a “stretch goal.”

California is not only well behind that pace, but the number of housing permits has actually turned downward — hovering around 100,000 units in 2019 — despite a strong economy and a median home value, $556,000, that is more than twice the national figure.

It is hard to overstate the threat posed to the state’s economy and prosperity. Housing costs are the primary reason that California’s poverty rate, 18.2 percent, is the highest of any state when adjusted for its cost of living, despite a thriving economy that has led to strong income growth and record-low unemployment.

California, Mired in a Housing Crisis, Rejects an Effort to Ease It
A lawmaker’s push for denser development near transit, overriding local zoning, was thwarted by a diverse group of legislative foes.
Conor Dougherty, NYTIMES

San Francisco is losing residents because it’s too expensive for nearly everyone – USA Today

SAN FRANCISCO — Social media influencer Sarah Tripp and her husband, Robbie Tripp, moved to San Francisco in 2016 brimming with optimism.

“We thought, here’s a city full of opportunities and connections where you go to work hard and succeed,” says Tripp, 27, founder of the lifestyle blog Sassy Red Lipstick.

But after a year-long hunt for suitable housing in San Francisco only turned up “places for $1 million that looked like rundown shacks and needed a remodel,” the couple packed up and moved to Phoenix.

They went from paying San Francisco rents of $2,500 for a one-bedroom, one-bath apartment that was far from shopping and other amenities, to purchasing a newly constructed 3,000-square-foot, four-bedroom, four-bathroom home where they’ll raise their newly arrived baby boy.

“It was cool to be living near all those high-tech startups,” Tripp says of her Bay Area years. “But you quickly saw that if you weren’t part of that, you’d be pushed out. It’s just sad.”

via USA Today

How a Tuxedoed Sommelier Wound Up Homeless in California – The New York Times

California, the country’s wealthiest and most populous state, also has the most homeless, an unremitting crisis that has confounded the state’s political leaders for decades and exposed one of the most extreme manifestations of economic inequality gripping the country.

Tent encampments — Oakland city officials count 90 of them — are now as much a part of the landscape as the bars and restaurants that cater to the city’s rising affluence. Many Americans are one medical emergency, one layoff, one family disaster away from bankruptcy or losing the roofs over their heads.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/28/us/homeless-san-francisco.html

I was driving around Downtown Denver earlier today and drove past three people sleeping on the street, a few blocks from the ballpark. They didn’t have much baggage – no tents or sleeping bags, and one of them was in a large electric wheelchair. You see a lot of homeless people in Denver so I might not have registered these three, but that I had read this article earlier in the day, and I can’t see how someone survives being homeless in an electric wheelchair.