‘L.A. Confidential’: The ultimate filming locations map

From Los Feliz to Long Beach, the 1997 classic exposes rot beneath the glamour of Los Angeles

 

“I remember the first time I got off the plane in LA. I came up to Hollywood, on La Brea or La Cienega, I can’t remember, through the oil fields,” says L.A. Confidential production designer Jeannine Oppewall. “And I thought to myself: ‘What the hell kind of city is this, with oil fields in the middle of it?’”

For Oppewall, who spoke to Curbed LA on the eve of the 1997 neo-noir’s 20th anniversary, the illusory romance of the City of Angels was stripped away in an instant. That’s what the movie does too, puncturing our inflated ideas of Old Hollywood glamour by plumbing the psychological depths of its key characters and (sometimes literally) exposing the rot underneath.

By Chris Eggertsen, la.curbed.com

Feodor’s Guide: Joseph Frank’s Dostoevsky, David Foster Wallace Review

from the footnotes:

8) Somebody has only to spend one term trying to teach literature in school to realize that the quickest way to kill a writer’s vitality for potential readers is to present that writer ahead of time as “great” or “classic.” Because then the author becomes for the students like medicine or vegetable, something that the authorities have declared “good for them” that they “ought to like,” and then the students’ nictitating membranes come down, and everybody’s dead. Should this surprise anybody? We could learn a lot from bored students who hate to read, in my opinion.

Whole article here:
Village Voice

Misc Auden Quotes

Every autobiography is concerned with two characters, a Don Quixote, the Ego, and a Sancho Panza, the Self.
“Hic et Ille”, p. 96

In societies with fewer opportunities for amusement, it was also easier to tell a mere wish from a real desire. If, in order to hear some music, a man has to wait for six months and then walk twenty miles, it is easy to tell whether the words, “I should like to hear some music,” mean what they appear to mean, or merely, “At this moment I should like to forget myself.” When all he has to do is press a switch, it is more difficult. He may easily come to believe that wishes can come true.
Interlude: West’s Disease”, p. 245

The surest sign that a man has a genuine taste of his own is that he is uncertain of it.
“Reading”, p. 6

The poet who writes “free” verse is like Robinson Crusoe on his desert island: he must do all his cooking, laundry and darning for himself. In a few exceptional cases, this manly independence produces something original and impressive, but more often the result is squalor — dirty sheets on the unmade bed and empty bottles on the unswept floor.
“Writing”, p. 22

A vice in common can be the ground of a friendship but not a virtue in common. X and Y may be friends because they are both drunkards or womanizers but, if they are both sober and chaste, they are friends for some other reason.
“Don Juan”, p. 403

No opera plot can be sensible, for people do not sing when they are feeling sensible.
“Notes on Music and Opera”, p. 472

Wikiquote

Comeback Cities

 You remember all those gallows jokes about American cities-like: will the last person out of Cleveland please turn out the lights. And then things got worse-if you went by the numbers and the conversational pall around the basket case of urban America. The white folks left, and middle-class black folks, too; and jobs and business. One of the best of the big-city mayors Ed Rendell of Philadelphia said the cause was lost, because the doctor wasn’t treating a bullet wound; he was confronting rampant cancer, without resources.

So the cities were left for dead, and guess what happened? Paul Grogan says they got vastly better and will get better yet-on the strength of poor-people’s markets and politics, on the further fall of crime rates, and the bust-up of the top-down bureaucracies running public schools and public housing. The really promising secret is that, as the man in Chicago said: “people like it here.” Comeback Cities are this hour on the Connection.
(Hosted by Christopher Lydon)

Guests:
Paul Grogan, author of “Comeback Cities”

Levellers and Diggers

The Levellers were a political movement during the English Civil War (1642–51) committed to popular sovereignty, extended suffrage, equality before the law and religious tolerance. The hallmark of Leveller thought was its populism, as shown by its emphasis on equal natural rights, and their practice of reaching the public through pamphlets, petitions and vocal appeals to the crowd.

The Levellers came to prominence at the end of the First English Civil War (1642–46) and were most influential before the start of the Second Civil War (1648–49). Leveller views and support were found in the populace of the City of London and in some regiments in the New Model Army. Their ideas were presented in their manifesto “Agreement of the People”. In contrast to the Diggers, the Levellers opposed common ownership, except in cases of mutual agreement of the property owners.

The Levellers were not a political party in the modern sense of the term. They were organised at the national level, with offices in a number of London inns and taverns such as The Rosemary Branch in Islington, which got its name from the sprigs of rosemary that Levellers wore in their hats as a sign of identification.

From July 1648 to September 1649, they published a newspaper, The Moderate, and were pioneers in the use of petitions and pamphleteering to political ends. They identified themselves by sea-green ribbons worn on their clothing.

Levellers, Wikipedia

The Diggers were a group of Protestant radicals in England, sometimes seen as forerunners of modern anarchism,and also associated with agrarian socialism and Georgism. Gerrard Winstanley’s followers were known as True Levellers in 1649 and later became known as Diggers, because of their attempts to farm on common land.

Their original name came from their belief in economic equality based upon a specific passage in the Acts of the Apostles. The Diggers tried (by “levelling” land) to reform the existing social order with an agrarian lifestyle based on their ideas for the creation of small, egalitarian rural communities. They were one of a number of nonconformist dissenting groups that emerged around this time.

Diggers, Wikipedia

Lick the Fat Elvis

THE NORTHWEST SOUND
From the sixth annual Northwest Music Directory,
a list of bands in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and British Columbia, in the December 1992 issue of The Rocket, a Seattle music magazine.

Amphetamine Lovebash
Aunt Acid
Bad Barbers
Big Daddy Meat Straw
Big White Pimp
Butt Yokels
Caveman Shoestore
Crystal Pickle
Dickweed
Diplomatic Immunity
Dithyrambic Smegma
Gaelic Stormtrooper
Genepool Lifeguard
Haggis
Induce Vomit
Lick the Fat Elvis
Love Snot
Middle Finger of God
Not Your Mother’s Tampon
Patchouli Sewer
Running with Scissors
Windham Hell

Harper’s magazine – March 1993 issue.

Things Not to Mess With, reddit

What do you NEVER fuck with? from r/AskReddit

Electricity
painfullfox
Electricity, it don’t play.

JustLouu
I used to work near a sub-station. People would occasionally try to steal cables… once all they found was a hand and a foot.

Meverseyou
I’m a paramedic. We had a DOA once of a guy that got electrocuted trying to steal metals from an electrical panel. This wasnt a residential one either, but from an industrial building.

Steam
JohnProof
High voltage guy here, my answer is “steam.”

I’ve worked up to 345,000; you definitely need to be on the ball but it can be done safely.

I would never willingly work around steam systems.

We had one plant with 48″ steam pipes under god knows how many hundreds of pounds and the extent of the safety training was “Always know where your exits are and if you hear water hammer run for your life.”

Garage door springs
duke_nukem_king
Garage door springs. Seriously. Unless you know what you’re doing, you’ll die.

Hornets
Temp_eraturing

However, if you DO have to fuck with them, there’s a few redneck methods of getting ’em gone that are REALLY effective.

My dad’s got a cabin way out in the woods, and one day we found a big Hornets’ nest just under a window, buzzing with sinister intent. Since the nest was about 15 feet in the air, the usual can of raid wasn’t going to cut it. My dad’s solution was to slam 3 beers before pulling out his wet/dry vac, and duct taping it to a spare piece of ~10ft metal piping (the cabin was in the middle of renovations to get running water, so construction material was all over the place). Then, he took the piece of pipe and positioned it using sawhorses so that the opening was just below the entrance of the hive. And then he turned on the vacuum.

The combined noise and vibration of the vacuum was enough to cause the entire hive to disgorge its angry occupants, who would buzz around around for about half a second before getting THWUPPED down the tube and battered around in the belly of the vacuum cleaner.

Now, unfortunately, this isn’t enough to kill them, which we learned after pulling the top of the vacuum cleaner and seeing a heaving, surging mass of chitin and malice attempting a mad dash for the sunlight. So, what do you do with a plastic barrel full of Hornets? Well, if you’re a 50 year old redneck with a thirst for vengeance, you pull out your trusty duct tape and Macgyver your F-150’s exhaust port to the end of the vacuum cleaner, and then roll enough coal to smoke every last sonuvabitch into a stupor. Then, you take the entire wet dry vac, and dump it into a nearby bonfire as a final “fuck you”.

So yeah, Hornets may be bad, but sometimes the absolute jankiest way to get rid of them ends up being exactly the one you needed.

Generic Dog Names Around the World

Non-Americans, does your culture have “old-fashioned” dog names like we do in America, such as Fido, Rex, Spot, Rover, etc, and what are some? from r/AskReddit

Snati, Sámur, Hvutti
Iceland

In Singapore, Male dog: boy boy. Female dog: girl girl.
We’re not a creative people.

Australia has Dusty, Sheila, Max, Dog and Bluey.

Pochi and John serve this purpose in Japan, but much like Spot, they’re pretty much only reserved for dogs that an author didn’t want to spend any effort naming. You almost never see actual dogs named either.

Tuzik, Bobik (Russian), Sirko (Ukrainian). No one gives them to dogs any more but they are still used in pet-related jokes.

Indians – Moti and Hira ( pearl & diamond) . There’s also Sheru ( tiger) .

In Ireland, the typical dog name is “Bran” after the legendary hero Fionn MacCumhaill’s hound. Rover is also an old one.

Firulais in Mexico

dig further at reddit

Low Wages in an Economic Boom Time

Today:
* 2.2 million working people are paid the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour or less.
* Approximately another 23 million people are paid between $7.25 and $11 an hour.
* Nearly half (42.4 percent) of working Americans make less than $15 per hour.

 

The productivity of American workers has roughly doubled since 1968 (the peak of the minimum wage in inflation-adjusted dollars), but workers making the minimum wage today make 25 percent less than they did in 1968, once adjusted to today’s dollars. Even though unemployment has dropped precipitously, sitting well below 5 percent for the last three years, it has not been until recently that wage increases for workers in lower-paying occupations have occurred.2 And much of that growth at the low end of the distribution has come from action on the minimum wage at not the federal level, but the state and local level.

Making the Economic Case for a $15 Minimum Wage
THE CENTURY FOUNDATION

Snags in the US Health Care System – NY Times

I saw the common sense that can underlie workarounds when my hospital floor instituted bar code scanning for medication administration. Using a hand-held scanner to register bar codes on medications and patients’ hospital bracelets sounds smart. But then some medications routinely came without bar codes, or had the wrong bar codes, and we nurses weren’t given an easy way to report those errors. Patients’ wrist bands could be difficult to scan and the process disturbed them, especially if they were asleep. The lists of medications on the computer screen were also surprisingly hard to read, which slowed everything down.

But the biggest problem was that the scanning software did not work with our electronic medical records — so all drugs had to be checked off in both systems. This is a huge problem when dealing with patients like those receiving bone-marrow transplants, who might get 20 drugs every morning — some of which are delivered through IVs and come with nonstandard doses. What was already a lengthy process suddenly took twice as long.

The American Medical System Is One Giant Workaround, New York TImes
By Ms. Brown is a clinical faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing.

From the comment section:

I am a nephrologist (kidney specialist) who has been practicing for 40 years. I have been forced to use electronic health records by insurance companies and Medicare. If you attempt to read encounter notes from an EHR you realize that the purpose is not to transmit medical information, but rather to optimize coding and billing. I will read a referring doctor’s note in the EHR and be unable to find a section that describes what the doctor is thinking and planning to do to treat the patient. It’s all about diagnostic codes and billing.

My insurance company requires that I use home delivery after the third prescription refill. I initiated a change last Thursday. I have contacted the pharmacy through its phone app, Internet, and telephone. I have done the same with my health care provider. I spent a total of two hours working on this during business hours so far with no success. Today, I discovered that the aforementioned move must be approved by my insurance company. That’s right, the same insurance company that requires me to use home delivery is holding up the transfer. It will be at least another 72 hours before the medication is shipped. As a result, I will probably run out before it gets here.

It took me 21 months and hours and hours of phone calls and letters to get a cholesterol screening covered by my insurance company. The cash price that the lab was charging: $900. Yes, almost a $1000 dollars for something I could have paid out of pocket less that $60 (which is what insurance covers). The kicker is that $3.78 WAS paid out by the insurance company for the blood draw.

A yearly cholesterol screening is covered item number 8 on my 100+ page insurance coverage contract. It is listed on the first page as a covered item. After dealing with the insurance company for 6 months and having the claim denied 3 times, I was told to appeal. My appeal was denied, 15 months later. As far as I can tell, my insurance company breached state law no less than 3 times in terms of timeliness and inappropriate denials.

The insurance blamed the doctor, the doctor blamed the lab, and the lab blamed the insurance company.