Movie Influence Connections Mapping Tool

What is Cinetrii?
Cinetrii is a service aimed at film enthusiasts who want to understand the context of the films that they love. Directors and screenwriters might take inspiration from works that have come before – Cinetrii tries to trace this lineage. The algorithm analyzes written reviews by film critics, seeks out references to other works and tries to rank the connections on relevance.

Woodstock 99 page – www.woodstock1999.com – Still Up

Woodstock ‘99 website is still operational and feels like getting into a Time Machine from r/InternetIsBeautiful

http://www.woodstock1999.com/

g2g079
And still more mobile friendly than half the sites out there.

hitemlow
Who would have guessed that having 1 layer to your website would work better than the cascading scaffold of duck tape and flex seal that plagues modern websites?

KingSmizzy
Modern web design: “The text resizes itself so that you can’t zoom in and it’s always awkwardly filling only a third of your screen. Also, enjoy these pop up auto play videos where the x button is smaller than an ants butthole.”

iaiahastur
But, before we get to that, here’s a cookie permission pop-up that hasn’t been resized, so the buttons are below your screen, and you can’t scroll down to them.

AMPed101
HELLO CAN WE SEND YOU NOTIFICATIONS PLEASE?

ladybelle85
My fave pop up are the ones that make you click a button that says… “NO, I don’t like saving money” when you’re turning down their offer.

Denver Breaks Record with 74 90 degree days

Ryan Osborne
Sep 19, 2020, The Denver Channel
DENVER — Colorado’s weird weather month continues.

Denver on Saturday hit 90 degrees, breaking the all-time record for most 90-degree days in a single year. The record-breaking heat comes a little over a week after our first snow of the season, which followed a Labor Day weekend of triple-digit temperatures.

Saturday’s high temperature was Denver’s 74th 90-degree day of the year, surpassing the 73 days of 90-degree weather in 2012.

Box office from 20 years ago. Y2K

Domestic Box Office For September 2000

I saw The Exorcist in the theater and there was a family in the audience with two kids that looked like they were under eight years old. They walked out during the crucifix mastubation scene. Great movie. Not for all audiences though.

Find books by Mood and Emotion – www.whichbook.net

Choosing books by mood and emotion
You can mix our mood sliders into great combinations – try unpredictable, lots of sex and optimistic and check what comes up. Flip the slider setting from optimistic to unusual and the books offered are quite different.

Click on a book cover that intrigues you and you can find out more. No need to wade through long reviews, or complicated plot summaries. There’s a short comment designed to convey the essence of the book, what it feels like to read. You can get a direct experience of the author’s voice in a sample paragraph. And there are a few Parallels – other books and sometimes tv shows, songs and even paintings which have some similarities with this one.

Choosing from the world map
Spin the globe and choose a book by the country it is set in. Click on an area – say Africa or Europe – and then click on a specific country. You will find places – and books – you maybe never knew about.
eg: Italy

Choosing by character and plot
You can choose the main character’s race, age, sexuality and/or gender. Or pick a favourite plot shape and discover the range of different types of read that use it.

Starting from a familiar bestseller
You won’t find the biggest bestsellers on Whichbook as everyone knows about them already. But you can use your enjoyment of a current bestseller to see titles with a similar mood that you might try next.

https://www.whichbook.net/

The Cost of Inequality: $42,000 per Median US Worker – Non Profit News | Nonprofit Quarterly

https://nonprofitquarterly.org/the-cost-of-inequality-42000-per-median-us-worker/

… the question that Eric Levitz poses in New York Magazine is provocative. And the data, certainly, illustrate the severity of the income shift that has taken place over the past 45 years.

Specifically, Levitz examines a study by Carter Price and Kathryn Edwards from the Rand Corporation. And, yes, that is the same Rand Corporation of Pentagon Papers fame, so it’s fair to call it an establishment-based source. Anyhow, Price and Edwards in their study, which was conducted in partnership with the Fair Work Center, ask the following question: If the share of worker income to total income were the same in 2018 as in 1975, and growth was the same, how much would the median worker earn in 2018?

The answer: $92,000. That’s a full $42,000 greater than the actual 2018 median worker income, which was $50,000.

Steve Dubb
The Cost of Inequality: $42,000 per Median US Worker
NONPROFIT QUARTERLY

10 Great Theater Books

Selections mine, blubs via Amazon.

Theatre Writings, Kenneth Tynan
The best of Kenneth Tynan’s theatre criticism, selected and edited by his biographer Dominic Shellard – with a foreword by Tom Stoppard.

This volume is an edited selection of theatre criticism by one of the most significant and influential writers on British theatre. Spanning the years 1944 to 1965, it includes all of Tynan’s major theatre reviews and articles written for the Evening Standard, the Daily Sketch and the Observer.

It also includes the text of his substantial 1964 speech to the Royal Society of Arts, setting out his vision for the National Theatre.

Tynan’s writings on theatre, according to eminent theatre historian Dominic Shellard, influenced the evolution of the whole of post-war theatre in Britain. And, with their characteristic mix of hyperbole, irreverence and prescience, they remain brilliantly entertaining today.

‘You can open this book on almost any page and come across a phrase or a vignette which is the next best thing to having been there’ – Tom Stoppard, from his Foreword

The Life of the Drama, Eric Bentley
“Eric Bentley’s radical new look at the grammar of theatre…is a work of exceptional virtue… The book justifies its title by being precisely about the ways in which life manifests itself in the theatre…This is a book to be read again and again.” – Frank Kermode, The New York Review of Books

How Plays Work, David Edgar
Distinguished playwright David Edgar examines the mechanisms and techniques which dramatists throughout the ages have employed to structure their plays and to express their meaning.

Written for playwrights and playgoers alike, Edgar’s analysis starts with the building blocks of whole plays – plot, character creation, genre and structure – and moves on to scenes and devices. He shows how plays share a common architecture without which the uniqueness of their authors’ vision would be invisible.

What does King Lear have in common with Cinderella? What does Jaws owe to Ibsen? From Aeschylus to Alan Ayckbourn, from Chekhov to Caryl Churchill, are there common principles by which all plays work?

Impro: Improvisation and the Theatre, Keith Johnstone
Impro isn’t just about the theater, it’s about life, about the ability to live improvisationally. Read it. Try the exercises out for yourself.

Great Moments in the Theatre, Benedict Nightingale
Renowned critic Benedict Nightingale, who served as chief theatre critic for the London Times from 1990–2010, collects what he considers the greatest moments from the past 2,500 years of theater. His informative and entertaining essays cover and celebrate a vast array of diverse, historical and important openings and events

On Acting, Laurence Olivier
If you want to read Olivier has to say about acting, read this. It’s fascinating. Amazon, having asked me to give a review, refuses to publish it unless I write five more words beyo the prior sentence, but I have nothing to add.

Hamlet, William Shakespeare
Shakespeare’s most famous play is one of the greatest stories in the literature of the world.

Distressed by his father’s death and his mother’s over-hasty remarriage, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, is faced by a specter from beyond the grave bearing a grim message of murder and revenge. The young prince is driven to the edge of madness by his struggle to understand the situation he finds himself in and to do his duty. Many others, including Hamlet’s beloved, the innocent Ophelia, are swept up in his tragedy.

The Best of Off-Broadway: Eight Contemporary Obie-Winning Plays
David Mamet –  Edmond
Wallace Shawn –  Aunt Dan and Lemon
Maria Irene Fornes – The Danube
Susan-Lori Parks – The Imperceptible Mutablilities of the Third Kingdom
Samuel Beckett – Ohio Impromptu
Christopher Durang –  The Marriage of Bette and Boo
Eric Bogosian – Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll
Craig Lucas –  Prelude to a Kiss

27 Wagons Full of Cotton and Other Plays, Tennessee Williams
The thirteen one-act plays collected in this volume include some of Tennessee Williams’s finest and most powerful work.

They are full of the perception of life as it is, and the passion for life as it ought to be, which have made The Glass Menagerie and A Streetcar Named Desire classics of the American theater.

Pounding Nails in the Floor with My Forehead, Eric Bogosian
In his fifth, brashest solo show, Eric Bogosian again aims scorching social commentary at the contemporary urban and suburban scene. From subway panhandlers to barbecue-crazed millionaires, Bogosian reveals the hidden humor, fear, hypocrisy and rage of Americans – including, for the first time, “Eric Bogosian,” a hyperaggressive standup comic. With this seductive element of self-revelation, he heightens the disturbing connections between his characters and, by extension, between us and the people we try not to see – and not to be – every day.