Rio – Duran Duran

Her name is Rio and she dances on the sand
Just like that river twisting through a dusty land
And when she shines, she really shows you all she can
Oh Rio, Rio, dance across the Rio Grande

I’ve seen you on the beach and I’ve seen you on TV
Two of a billion stars, it means so much to me
Like a birthday or a pretty view
But then I’m sure that you know it’s just for you

Her name is Rio and she dances on the sand
Just like that river twisting through a dusty land
And when she shines, she really shows you all she can
Oh Rio, Rio, dance across the Rio Grande
Hey now, wooh, look at that, did she nearly run you down?
At the end of the drive, the lawmen arrive
You make me feel alive, alive, alive
I’ll take my chance, ’cause luck is on my side or something
I know what you’re thinking, I’ll tell you something, I know what you’re thinking

Her name is Rio and she dances on the sand
Just like that river twists across a dusty land
And when she shines, she really shows you all she can
Oh Rio, Rio, dance across the Rio Grande

Her name is Rio, she don’t need to understand
And I might find her if I’m looking like I can
Oh Rio, Rio, hear them shout across the land
From mountains in the north down to the Rio Grande

Duran Duran are an English new wave band formed in Birmingham in 1978. The group were a leading band in the MTV-driven Second British Invasion of the US in the 1980s. The group was formed by keyboardist Nick Rhodes and bassist John Taylor, with the later addition of drummer Roger Taylor, and after numerous personnel changes, guitarist Andy Taylor (none of the Taylors are related) and lead singer Simon Le Bon. These five members featured the most commercially successful line-up.

Wikipedia

Bob Marley: An Extraordinary Day- Bob Marley Remembrance – BBC

Bob Marley: An extraordinary day
The Documentary

Forty years after the death of reggae singer Bob Marley, British writer and dub poet, Benjamin Zephaniah, remembers the day Jamaica came to a standstill for the singer’s funeral.

Bob Marley was laid to rest on the 21 May 1981, 11 days after dying from skin cancer.

The extraordinary day saw the island come together to mourn their most famous son – and to celebrate his life and work. He was more than a singer and writer to the people of Jamaica, he was a national hero and prophet with his beliefs in peaceful resolution and Rastafarian religion.

For days leading up to the funeral, tens of thousands of people filed past his body and on the day, thousands lined the streets of Kingston while the 12,000 capacity National Arena was jam-packed.

The outpouring of emotion on the day was unprecedented in Jamaican history with some comparing it to the kind of atmosphere at JFK or Martin Luther King’s funeral.

As Benjamin recalls with some of the people who were in Jamaica that day, everything stopped – even the Government’s budget statement was delayed by a week on the direction of the new Prime Minister.

The singer’s hits could be heard right across the island as sound systems pumped out songs like No Woman, No Cry, I Shot the Sherrif and One Love. Meanwhile two of his sons danced and the Wailers and the I3s performed.

Among those remembering this extraordinary day – I3s singer Judy Mowatt, reggae musician Michael Ibo Cooper, reporter Robin Denselow and Edward Williams who was a 13-year-old boy living in Kingston at the time.

BBC

Home Health Care Workers – The Difference a Union Makes

Their work days are largely similar. Both mother and daughter rise early and make a lengthy commute — up to one hour by car for Danielle and up to two hours by bus for Brittany. They make their clients’ meals. They shop for groceries and clothes, pick up medicine, run to the post office. They care for pets. They dress and undress, change diapers and give baths. They assist with medication. They dust, vacuum and do the laundry. They talk and listen to the stories of their clients’ lives, often for hours.

But the similarities end there. Brittany makes nearly $20 an hour, usually working five days a week. But without child care for her 8-year-old son during the pandemic, she’s been working no more than four. She has paid time off, medical and dental insurance, a retirement plan and many other benefits. Danielle works seven days a week making half Brittany’s wage. She has no benefits through her job, qualifies for Medicaid and is barely able to survive.

These differences come down to where Brittany and Danielle live. Brittany lives in Washington State and belongs to a union of long-term-care workers, S.E.I.U. Local 775, that has worked with the state for better pay and working conditions. Danielle lives in Arkansas, where she has none of that.

Mother and Daughter Do the Same Job. Why Does One Make $9 More an Hour?
By Brigid Schulte and Cassandra Robertson
Ms. Schulte is the director of the Better Life Lab at New America, a progressive think tank, and the author of “Overwhelmed.” Dr. Robertson is a senior policy and research manager at New America.
NYTIMES

Homeless in LA

Homeless service providers and advocates have mixed feelings about a new order from a federal judge that Los Angeles must provide shelter to all unhoused people living on Skid Row by the fall.

In a rare move, Judge David Carter said LA’s decades of bad policy decisions have contributed to a disaster that can only be solved by forcing the city’s hand. But other legal experts see the order as getting the diagnosis right, but the remedy wrong.

Here & Now‘s Tonya Mosley talks about the nuances with Andy Bales, CEO of Union Rescue Mission, and Eric Tars, legal director for the National Homelessness Law Center.