Loopholes / Hacks – reddit, r/AskReddit

DMV Hack
cad908
NY State had a glitch in their Motor Vehicle system for a while. If you got a moving violation, you would plead guilty, and overpay it by $5. They would send you back a check for $5, but you don’t cash it. They would not apply points to your license until the case was fully adjudicated. If you waited until a year passed, and then cashed it, those points would roll off, so you would never actually have any points showing on your license.

mikkeman
It amazes me how people are able to find these kind of loopholes.

BlakeClass
It’s almost always people working there. A clerk sees 100’s of tickets paid a week, all it takes is one getting over paid and the clerk sees a ‘points pending’ status. The clerk then gets a thought of “what if they never cash the check?”… and a loophole is born. To my knowledge this is also how most hacking works.

Airport Hack
prvacya
I still use the loophole of jumping on a shuttle bus out of LAX to a parking garage(/or hotel, yes) and then calling an Uber/Lyft from there to avoid the airport prices. Brings the ride home down to $10 from $40.

lionheart832
Here at my airport in st Louis, I literally just walk the 3 blocks down to the gas station and save about 25 bucks bc those airport prices are ridic

Bar Hack
ATLL2112
Was at a bar. They ran a $2 shot special for any of the house stuff. I like vodka tonics though. However, those are $6.

Me, having taken Algebra I twice, knew $2<$6. I ask the bartender how much she’ll charge me for tonic water. She replies, “nothing”.

I proceed to order a $2 shot of vodka and a free glass of tonic water.

Johntanamo_Bay
‘Having taken Algebra twice’ killed me. Thanks for the laugh.

Jumpinjaxs890
I thought it was a state requirement to take it two times.

Xfetzek17
I think he was just referring to taking algebra 1 twice

finackles
I believe that taking algebra I twice = taking algebra II once.
This is the distributive property, or something.

Jumpinjaxs890
Your thinking of the communicable property. I only remember this from health class.

What is the best loophole you have ever heard of? from AskReddit

Brad Pitt and Anthony Hopkins – Interview Magazine

HOPKINS: I’ve been dreaming of elephants. I don’t know why. There was a film I saw, when I was a child, called Elephant Boy. The elephant would take Sabu, the main character, through the jungle, and I remember sitting there with my grandfather watching it. My impression is that I sat on this big beast, whatever it is—life. At some point, I made an unconscious choice to sit on this beautiful, powerful thing. And I just go where it takes me. I think that what happens to people like you and myself. We don’t even know why. Maybe it’s a desire to escape from something. But what I believe now is that we can’t take credit or blame.

Interview Magazine

“We work in the dark—we do what we can—we give what we have. Our doubt is our passion and our passion is our task. The rest is the madness of art.” Henry James quote

“The Middle Years” is a short story by Henry James, first published in Scribner’s Magazine in 1893. It may be the most affecting and profound of James’s stories about writers. The novelist in the tale speculates that he has spent his whole life learning how to write, so a second life would make sense, “to apply the lesson.” Second lives aren’t usually available, so the novelist says of himself and his fellow artists: “We work in the dark—we do what we can—we give what we have. Our doubt is our passion and our passion is our task. The rest is the madness of art.”

Wikipedia

Building, quotes on

We shape our buildings, thereafter they shape us.
Winston Churchill

We require from buildings, as from men, two kinds of goodness: first, the doing their practical duty well: then that they be graceful and pleasing in doing it; which last is itself another form of duty.
John Ruskin

To be a man is to be responsible: to be ashamed of miseries you did not cause; to be proud of your comrades’ victories; to be aware, when setting one stone, that you are building a world.
Antoine de Saint Exupéry

wikiquote

Top 10 Cities to Visit in 2020 – Lonely Planet

1. Salzburg, Austria
2. Washington, D.C., United States
3. Cairo, Egypt
4. Galway, Ireland
5. Bonn, Germany
6. La Paz, Bolivia
7. Kochi, India
8. Vancouver, Canada
9. Dubai, United Arab Emirates
10. Denver, United States

Denver’s elevated position as one of the USA’s most charming boomtowns has reached new heights as the Mile High City enters its latest phase of growth, creative energy and damn good food. Construction cranes dot the mountain-studded horizon and empty lots turn into hip new hotels seemingly overnight, while new food halls such as Milk Market satisfy appetites with an eclectic mix of farm-to-table and international fare. The mind-bending Santa Fe art experience Meow Wolf has installed a psychedelic ride called ‘Kaleidoscape’ at Elitch Gardens Theme and Water Park as a precursor to a permanent $50-million Meow Wolf installation to come in 2021. Meanwhile, the fascinating Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art has moved into a magnetic Olson Kundig–designed building within the city’s Golden Triangle Creative District

lonelyplanet.com

The Giving Machine – Altruistic Vending Machine

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Imagine swiping your credit card at a vending machine and instead of buying a candy bar for yourself, you buy a piglet for a family in a third-world country. Or a polio vaccine. Or a pair of shoes. Or 100 meals for your local foodbank. With the #LightTheWorld Giving Machines, that’s exactly what happens. The Giving Machines provide a way for people to quickly and easily help those in need and make their Christmas season a little more meaningful for themselves – and countless others.

Writer Square
16th and Lawrence [SouthWest corner]
Downtown Denver
The machines will open November 26th 2019 at 11am and be open every day from 9am to 11pm through January 1, 2020

https://givingmachinesdenver.com/

I bought three of ‘2 meals at a women’s shelter’, which were $3.50 each.

Homeless in America – 60 Minutes

“Rent is obscene here”: The issues forcing people in Seattle onto the street
Anderson Cooper visits a tent city in the Seattle area and hears from some of America’s more than 500,000 homeless people

Tricia Wood: I used to be one of those people that thought that if anyone was homeless they just needed to go get a job. That would solve their homeless problems.

Anderson Cooper: How would you answer that question now? Why can’t they just get a job?

Tricia Wood: Oh my goodness. Maybe they have a job.

Josiah Wood has a full-time job. He gets up before dawn and takes mass transit to work as a maintenance supervisor at the Hard Rock Café downtown. Though he makes $19.50 an hour, the rent for an average one-bedroom apartment in Seattle would eat up half his salary. He and Tricia say they’ve been saving up money so they can afford a security deposit and monthly rent.

Anderson Cooper: How long do you think you’ll keep living in the tent city?

Tricia Wood: I would hope we are out of here by winter.

60 Minutes

10 Books from the 2010s – Desultory Notes Notable Books

Note – selections mine, descriptions taken from Amazon.

Rat Girl, Kristin Hersh
In 1985, Kristin Hersh was just starting to find her place in the world. After leaving home at the age of fifteen, the precocious child of unconventional hippies had enrolled in college while her band, Throwing Muses, was getting off the ground amid rumors of a major label deal. Then everything changed: she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and found herself in an emotional tailspin; she started medication, but then discovered she was pregnant. An intensely personal and moving account of that pivotal year, Rat Girl is sure to be greeted eagerly by Hersh’s many fans.

Talk Show, Dick Cavett
For years, Dick Cavett played host to the nation’s most famous personalities on his late-night talk show. In this humorous and evocative book, we get to hear Cavett’s best tales, as he recounts great moments with the legendary entertainers who crossed his path and offers his own trenchant commentary on contemporary American culture and politics.

Pym, Mat Johnson
Recently canned professor of American literature Chris Jaynes is obsessed with The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, Edgar Allan Poe’s strange and only novel. When he discovers the manuscript of a crude slave narrative that seems to confirm the reality of Poe’s fiction, he resolves to seek out Tsalal, the remote island of pure and utter blackness that Poe describes with horror. Jaynes imagines it to be the last untouched bastion of the African Diaspora and the key to his personal salvation.

How Music Works, David Byrne
How Music Works is David Byrne’s incisive and enthusiastic look at the musical art form, from its very inceptions to the influences that shape it, whether acoustical, economic, social or technological. Utilizing his incomparable career and inspired collaborations with Talking Heads, Brian Eno, and many others, Byrne taps deeply into his lifetime of knowledge to explore the panoptic elements of music, how it shapes the human experience, and reveals the impetus behind how we create, consume, distribute, and enjoy the songs, symphonies, and rhythms that provide the backbeat of life. Byrne’s magnum opus uncovers ever-new and thrilling realizations about the redemptive liberation that music brings us all.

The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion, Jonathan Haidt
Why can’t our political leaders work together as threats loom and problems mount? Why do people so readily assume the worst about the motives of their fellow citizens? In The Righteous Mind, social psychologist Jonathan Haidt explores the origins of our divisions and points the way forward to mutual understanding.

Mo Meta Blues, Ahmir Questlove Thompson
Mo’ Meta Blues is a punch-drunk memoir in which Everyone’s Favorite Questlove tells his own story while tackling some of the lates, the greats, the fakes, the philosophers, the heavyweights, and the true originals of the music world. He digs deep into the album cuts of his life and unearths some pivotal moments in black art, hip hop, and pop culture.

Furious Cool: Richard Pryor and the World That Made Him, David Henry and Joe Henry
Richard Pryor was arguably the single most influential performer of the second half of the twentieth century, and certainly he was the most successful black actor/comedian ever. Controversial and somewhat enigmatic during his life, Pryor’s performances opened up a whole new world of possibilities, merging fantasy with angry reality in a way that wasn’t just new–it was theretofore unthinkable. Now, this groundbreaking and revelatory work brings him to life again both as a man and as an artist, providing an in-depth appreciation of his talent and his lasting influence, as well as an insightful examination of the world he lived in and the myriad influences that shaped both his persona and his art.

What We See When We Read, Peter Mendelsund
A gorgeously unique, fully illustrated exploration into the phenomenology of reading—how we visualize images from reading works of literature, from one of our very best book jacket designers, himself a passionate reader.

The Courage to Be Disliked: The Japanese Phenomenon That Shows You How to Change Your Life and Achieve Real Happiness, Ichiro Kishimi and Fumitake Koga
Is happiness something you choose for yourself? The Courage to Be Disliked presents a simple and straightforward answer. Using the theories of Alfred Adler, one of the three giants of nineteenth-century psychology alongside Freud and Jung, this book follows an illuminating dialogue between a philosopher and a young man. Over the course of five conversations, the philosopher helps his student to understand how each of us is able to determine the direction of our own life, free from the shackles of past traumas and the expectations of others.

How to Get Successful by F*cking Up Your Life: Essays on Addiction and Recovery, Anna David
Anna David was, in every way, groomed for success. She grew up in an affluent community and came from a family that prioritized SAT scores, Harvard attendance and high-paying jobs. The problem was, she had low SAT scores, was rejected by Harvard and spent her early life feeling like the family’s great disappointment.Concluding that success was not for her, Anna focused her energies on an area where she excelled: drugs, alcohol and general mayhem. Washing ashore on the beaches of recovery at the age of 30, she begrudgingly entered a world of sobriety. That’s when she discovered that there were all sorts of ways to define success—and what’s more, that it was never too late to find it.The stories in this collection document her journey from self-indulgent party girl to sober and only semi-indulgent woman.

The 10 Most Influential Films of the Decade (and 20 Other Favorites) – The New York Times

‘The Avengers’ (2012)

Sequels weren’t new and neither were long, crowded, noisy superhero spectacles when this juggernaut landed. But “The Avengers,” released after Disney’s acquisition of Marvel Studios, was nonetheless a big industry bang: It heralded the dominance of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, where we all now live whether we like it or not.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/24/movies/best-movies-2010s-decade.html

. . . we would assume that what it was we meant would have been listed in some book set down beyond the sky’s far reaches, if at all there was a purpose here. But now I think the purpose lives in us and that we fall into an error if we do not keep our own true notebook of the way we came, how the sleet stung, or how a wandering bird cried at the window. . . – LOREN EISELEY

Epigraph from True Notebooks: A Writer’s Year at Juvenile Hall, Mark Salzman

Do It Again – The Kinks

Standing in the middle of nowhere
Wondering how to begin
Lost between tomorrow and yesterday
Between now and then
And now we’re back where we started
Here we go round again
Day after day I get up and I say
I better do it again
Where are all the people going
Round and round till we reach the end
One day leading to another
Get up go out do it again
Then it’s back where you started
Here we go round again
Back where you started
Come on do it again
And you think today is going to be better
Change the world and do it again
Give it all up and start all over
You say you will but you don’t know when
Then it’s back where you started
Here we go round again
Day after day I get up and I say
Come on better do it again
The days go by and you wish you were a different guy
Different friends and a new set of clothes
You make alterations and (a fact in you knows)
A new house a new car a new job a new nose
But it’s superficial and it’s only skin deep
Cause the voices in your head keep shouting in your sleep
Get back, get back
Back where you started, here we go round again
Back where you started, come on do it again
Back where you started, here we go round again
Day after day I get up and I say, do it again
Do it again
Day after day I get up and I say, do it again

SUSAN SONTAG: Ten Neglected Novels

Charlotte Bronte
VILLETTE

George Meredith
THE EGOIST

Machado de Assis
EPITAPH FOR A SMALL WINNER

Alfred Döblin
BERLIN ALEXANDERPLATZ: The Story of Franz Biberkopf

Witold Gombrowicz
FERDYDURKE

Knut Hamsun
HUNGER

Venedikt Erofeev
MOSCOW TO THE END OF THE LINE

Randall Jarrell
PICTURES FROM AN INSTITUTION: A Comedy

Italo Calvino
INVISIBLE CITIES

Jiri Grusa
THE QUESTIONNAIRE

from – The Reader’s Catalog: An Annotated Selection of More Than 40,000 of the Best Books in Print in 208 Categories (Reader’s Catalogue)

TONI MORRISON: Books for Fiction Writers

“Beginning fiction writers ought to find the following 13 books helpful in a number of ways.”

Flannery O’Connor
THE COMPLETE STORIES

William Faulkner
THE SOUND AND THE FURY

Jean Toomer
CANE

Italo Svevo
THE CONFESSIONS OF ZENO

George Meredith
THE EGOIST

Eudora Welty
ONE WRITER’S BEGINNINGS

Marilynne Robinson
HOUSEKEEPING

Louise Erdrich
LOVE MEDICINE

Franz Kafka
THE METAMORPHOSIS

Toni Cade Bambara
THE SEA BIRDS ARE STILL ALIVE

James Dickey
DELIVERANCE

Marguerite Duras
THE VICE-CONSUL

James Wilcox
MODERN BAPTISTS

from – The Reader’s Catalog: An Annotated Selection of More Than 40,000 of the Best Books in Print in 208 Categories (Reader’s Catalogue)

We stand on a mountain pass in the midst of whirling snow and blinding mist…

“We stand on a mountain pass in the midst of whirling snow and blinding mist, through which we get glimpses now and then of paths which may be deceptive. If we stand still we shall be frozen to death. If we take the wrong road we shall be dashed to pieces. We do not certainly know whether there is any right one. What must we do? ‘Be strong and of a good courage.’ Act for the best, hope for the best, and take what comes.… If death ends all, we cannot meet death better.”

Fitz James Stephen, quoted in The Will to Believe, William James.

Benny Andersson’s Dansband

Andersson, 72, sees his group, which goes by BAO (pronounced “bah-oh”), as part of the tradition of the hardworking “dansbands” that entertained Swedes for generations. Dansbands, whose popularity peaked in the 1970s and 1980s, would roam the country and play mainly pop, rock, disco and the cheesy easy-listening known as schlager with one goal in mind: Get people to dance. Many wore fantastically garish matching costumes.

BAO’s sets are puzzlingly diverse, as if someone had grafted together the playlists of 20 genres on Spotify. Attending four tour stops last week, I took in 16 hours of music — like Wagner’s “Ring” cycle, only more upbeat — and heard waltzes, big-band jazz, pop tunes, polkas, boogie, chansons, rockabilly, glam-rock stomps and traditional folk tunes. The band basically went through all the styles Abba smoothly integrated into its signature hits.

“They capture the Swedishness of the music,” Jan Ryden, 55, said of BAO, at the end of the show in Eskilstuna, 90 minutes west of Stockholm.

Elisabeth Vincentelli, A Bus Journey to a Time Before Abba