Rock for Choice – 1990’s Music Supporting Abortion Rights

Rock for Choice (or Rock 4 Choice) was a series of benefit concerts held over the ten-year period between 1991 and 2001. The concerts were designed to allow musicians to show their support for the abortion rights movement in the United States and Canada.

…The concert series evolved into an organization managed by the Feminist Majority Foundation, which released a number of compilation albums featuring artists that supported Rock for Choice. The album Spirit of ’73: Rock for Choice included fourteen female artists of the 90s singing hits from the 70s[9] and was named based on the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision in 1973.[10]

The final Rock for Choice concert was held in 2001 and was emceed by actress Gillian Anderson.[11]

Artists featured in the Rock for Choice concerts included:

wikipedia

1983 – 40 Best Albums – Pazz and Jop Poll

The 1983 Pazz & Jop Critics Poll
Albums
1. Michael Jackson: Thriller
2. REM: Murmur
3. Talking Heads: Speaking in Tongues
4. X: More Fun in the New World
5. The Police: Synchronicity
6. U2: War
7. Lou Reed: Legendary Hearts
8. Johnathan Richman & the Modern Lovers: Jonathan Sings!
9. Richard Thompson: Hand of Kindness
10. Bob Dylan: Infidels
11. Elvis Costello: Punch the Clock
12. Culture Club: Colour By Numbers
13. Randy Newman: Trouble in Paradise
14. George Clinton: Computer Games
15. Big Country: The Crossing
16. Jerry Lee Lewis: The Sun Sessions
17. Aztec Camera: High Land, Hard Rain
18. T-Bone Burnett: Proof Through the Night
19. David Bowie: Let’s Dance
20. James Blood Ulmer: Odyssey
21. Rolling Stones: Undercover
22. The Blasters: Non Fiction
23. New Order: Power, Corruption and Lies
24. Malcolm McLaren: Duck Rock
25. Prince: 1999
26. Violent Femmes: Violent Femmes
27. Was (Not Was): Born to Laugh at Tornadoes
28. Graham Parker: The Real Macaw
29. Marshall Crenshaw: Field Day
30. The Replacements: Hootenanny
31. Eurythmics: Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)
32. Tom Waits: Swordfishtrombones
33. Eddy Grant: Killer on the Rampage
34. Trio: Trio and Error
35. Kid Creole and the Coconuts: Doppelganger
36. The Fleshtones: Hexbreaker
37. Linda Ronstadt: What’s New
38. King Sunny Adé and His African Beats: Synchro System
39. Nile Rodgers: Adventures in the Land of the Good Groove
40. Paul Simon: Hearts and Bones

Foundations – Leopold Staff

This poem was written immediately after World War Il, in Poland, among the ruins, of which those in the figurative sense were even more oppressive than the physical ones. There was literally nothing. How could a poet react to that situation? What was left was to do what a child does, who when trying to draw a house often starts with the smoke from the chimney, then draws a chimney, and then the rest. So this is a poem of naked faith.

FOUNDATIONS
I built on the sand
And it tumbled down,
I built on a rock
And it tumbled down.
Now when I build, I shall begin
With the smoke from the chimney.

LEOPOLD STAFF 1878 – 1957
Translated from the Polish by Czeslaw Milosz

A Book Of Luminous Things: An International Anthology of Poetry

Some Epigraphs Recently Encountered

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion it has taken place.”
– Often attributed to George Bernhard Shaw. Although its doubtful he ever said it.

If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?
Alan Alda

There is no intellectual exercise that is not ultimately pointless.
– J.L. Borges, in “Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote

A Student’s Guide to Analytical Mechanics
John L. Bohn

This morning I met a woman with a golden nose. She was riding in a Cadillac with a monkey in her arms. Her driver stopped and she asked me, “Are you Fellini?” With this metallic voice she continued, “Why is it that in your movies, there is not even one normal person?”
— Federico Fellini

The Promise
Damon Galgut

Definition of epigraph
1: an engraved inscription
2: a quotation set at the beginning of a literary work or one of its divisions to suggest its theme

How I Learned to Drive – NYTIMES Review

It’s rare to encounter the kind of breathless silence I experienced during an unnerving hotel room scene in the unforgettable revival of Paula Vogel’s “How I Learned to Drive.”

On the night I saw the production, hundreds of audience members listened with rapt attention — I didn’t hear anyone unwrap a mint or fumble for a tissue. I didn’t even hear a whisper break the stillness in the air. There was just the steady buzz of the lights, suddenly deafeningly loud, as if they were performing their own monologue.

If I could direct a scene representing why I love theater, it would look something like this: Mary-Louise Parker and David Morse delivering crushing performances — both sentimental and horrific, utterly complex — of a Pulitzer Prize-winning play to an enthralled audience.

‘How I Learned to Drive’ Review: Many Miles to Go Before a Reckoning
Mary-Louise Parker and David Morse have returned to Paula Vogel’s 1997 Pulitzer-winning play about sexual abuse for its Broadway debut.
Maya Phillips