Where did the *record scratch* / *freeze frame* joke originate?

I know the trope. It seems familiar. Can’t think of any examples though.

reddit thread regarding the issue.

It’s a pretty popular trope in 80s and 90s movies. A lot of them would start en medias res with the character in some ridiculous situation. There would be a record scratch and a freeze frame of the character’s face, followed by the character saying something like “You’re probably wondering how I got here,” only for the story to rewind and explain from the beginning. I can’t think of a classic example off the top of my head, but Deadpool did a parody of it, if memory serves.

Pretty popular trope which nobody can remember a single example of?


Mandela Effect?

Psychologists call the phenomenon confabulation. The term is used clinically to refer to memory defects experienced by patients with brain damage, and also to describe everyday phenomena like embellishing the truth when recounting events and inventing facts on the fly to fill in gaps in memory. We’ve all done these things at one time or another, though we’re rarely conscious of it when we do.

What is going on? Non-English version.

Groovy reddit on reddit level news.

What’s going on on the non-English parts of the internet that we’re all missing out on? from r/AskReddit

Here’s a subreddit along similar lines –

Global Talk is a “softcore” news about various things happening in different countries. While large news posts are allowed, the aim of this subreddit is to share things that aren’t typically considered large news in other countries, rather just things people are talking about.

 

Post Decision possibility.

LPT: Instead of excessively worrying over a decision, decide what you’re going to do, then do things to *make* it the right decision afterward.

The best class I took in my Masters program was a decision science course. The prof had a lot of great LPT-type advice, but one thing he said in particular has stuck with me. He said most people will excessively worry and over-analyze a decision, but then do very little about it after the decision is made. We spend 95% of our energy pre-decision, then 5% after. However, he said a lot of the science shows that very often there isn’t a “right” decision, but there are things we can do after that will make it right. For example, don’t feel like there’s a right/wrong decision to make when considering a job offer out of state. If you do decide to take it, once you’re there do things to “make it” the right decision, like go out and make friends, work hard but keep a good work/life balance, etc. Change that 95/5 split to more like 50/50.

via reddit

*LPT -> Life Pro Tip