Category: Arts and Letters

Theme Song for Your Quest?


Yes or no? from suspiciouslyspecific

clocksoftime
Gotta have a theme tune for the quest

unbannable4
I have a mix of 80s power ballads exactly for this occasion.

CardinalHawk21
It’s never a wrong time to play Radar Love by Golden Earing while driving.

Senior-Sharpie
That’s the jam followed by Twilight Zone!

Stormaggedon2169
Now heres the question: your favorite song is playing as you pull into the parking lot. Do you stay and finish it?

barlog123
It’s the pragmatic thing to do. If I went in there without finishing the song It’d bother me and I wouldn’t be able to focus.

Wicked Game – Chris Isaak

“Wicked Game” is a song by American rock musician Chris Isaak, released from his third studio album Heart Shaped World (1989). Despite being released as a single in 1989, it did not become a hit until it was featured in the 1990 David Lynch film Wild at Heart. Lee Chesnut, an Atlanta radio station music director who loved David Lynch films, began playing the song, and it quickly became an American top-ten hit in January 1991, reaching number six on the Billboard Hot 100, making it the first hit song of Isaak’s career. Additionally, the single became a number-one hit in Belgium and reached the top 10 in several other nations.

Wikipedia

What would you have liked to have been, if you hadn’t been a professional musician?
I’ve worked in a funeral home, did roofing jobs, drove delivery and spent time working the docks of Stockton, California, unloading ships. None of it was near as much fun and I didn’t get to wear a sequined suit…

Have you learned anything new about songwriting, interviewing your guests for the show?
Glen Campbell told me “stay out of the way of a good song.” I think it’s true. If a song’s good, don’t overdo it.

CHRIS ISAAK: On Record
American Songwriter

October, 2011


https://web.archive.org/web/20111015031341/http://www.nytimes.com/

1. Maroon 5 Feat. Christina Aguilera – ‘Moves Like Jagger’
2. Foster the People – ‘Pumped Up Kicks’
3. Adele – ‘Someone Like You’
4. Bad Meets Evil Feat. Bruno Mars – ‘Lighters’
5. Rihanna – ‘Cheers (Drink to That)’
6. Britney Spears – ‘I Wanna Go’
7. David Guetta Feat. Usher – ‘Without You’
8. Cobra Starship Feat. Sabi – ‘You Make Me Feel…’
9. Lady Gaga – ‘You and I’
10. Lil Wayne – ‘How to Love’

https://popcrush.com/top-40-pop-songs-october-2011/

Best Book of Past 125 Years – New York Times Requests Your Suggestion

Help Us Choose the Best Book

The New York Times Book Review has just turned 125. That got us wondering: What is the best book that was published during that time? We’d like to hear from you. For the month of October we’ll take nominations, in November we’ll ask you to vote on a list of finalists and in December we’ll share the winner.

Note – First Review was Oct. 10, 1896

My vote –
The Varieties of Religious Experience, William James

RIP – Paddy Moloney

He formed several groups with musicians in duets and trios, and in 1962 formed the band that would become The Chieftains Sean Potts and Michael Tubridy.

The Chieftains went on to become one of the best-known Irish traditional groups in the world, winning six Grammys as well as many other awards.

Mr Moloney and The Chieftains worked with a vast range of artists over their long career, making guest appearances with and contributing to albums by Ry Cooder, Marianne Faithful, Mick Jagger, Elvis Costello, and Sinead O’Connor. In 1987 they recorded the acclaimed 1987 album Irish Heartbeat album with Van Morrison.

Paddy Moloney, The Chieftains founder, dies aged 83

Here’s an interview with NPR:
The Chieftains: For 50 Years, Irish Music For The World

MONTAGNE: Talking about roots, what were you thinking when you collaborated with some of Nashville’s top artists: Lyle Lovett, Rosanne Cash, Ricky Skaggs?

MALONEY: Yeah. For us and for me to go to Nashville was almost going to another part of Ireland and meeting up with all your country cousins and just go for it. Because you didn’t have to duck and dash with these people, they knew the music. And if you played it once or twice, naturally they’d just pick it up and play it.

Shattered – The Rolling Stones, Schmatta

“Shattered” is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones from their 1978 album Some Girls. The song is a reflection of American lifestyles and life in 1970s-era New York City, but also influences from the English punk rock movement can be heard.

wikipedia

Uh huh shattered, uh huh shattered
Love and hope and sex and dreams
Are still surviving on the street
Look at me, I’m in tatters!
I’m a shattered
Shattered

Friends are so alarming
My lover’s never charming
Life’s just a cocktail party on the street
Big Apple
People dressed in plastic bags
Directing traffic
Some kind of fashion
Shattered

Laughter, joy, and loneliness and sex and sex and sex and sex
Look at me, I’m in tatters
I’m a shattered
Shattered

All this chitter-chatter, chitter-chatter, chitter-chatter ’bout
Shmatta, shmatta, shmatta, I can’t give it away on 7th Avenue
This town’s been wearing tatters (shattered, sha ooobie shattered)

Location, location, location. If there’s an element of luck to my story, it’s that the Stones—Mick, Keith, and Woody—lived in the same place as me. If Picasso had a “blue period” and Orson Welles a “film noir period,” then this was the Stones’ “New York period.” They wrote songs about the city—their new album gave a shout-out to 8th Street—and became part of its fabric. When Mick sang about walkin’ Central Park and about schmattas on Seventh Avenue, he was drawing from experience. I mean, how many non-New Yorkers even know what a schmatta is? (Yiddish for “rag.”)

Under Their Thumb: How a Nice Boy from Brooklyn Got Mixed Up with the Rolling Stones (and Lived to Tell About It)
Bill German
(Great book, by the way. Highly recommended.)

Reebusacassafram – Invented Filler Word

DUBNER: All right, well, Levitt, I feel indebted to you because I feel it’s if not valuable, then at least useful, and I use it now and again. And so I would like to return the favor, to give you something that you can use in certain circumstances. So here’s the thing. Do you ever have a circumstance where you’re interacting with someone, maybe kind of in passing and they say something to you and you don’t quite catch it, or they say something to you that you don’t want to have heard but you kind of need to say something? You ever have that at all?

LEVITT: Yeah, all the time.

DUBNER: All right, so here’s what you say. You ready? You might want to write it down.

LEVITT: Yep.

DUBNER: You say, “reebusacassafram.” Let me hear you say that.

LEVITT: Say it one more time.

DUBNER: Reebusacassafram.

LEVITT: Reebus Acassafram?

DUBNER: More like one word. Reebusacassafram.

LEVITT: Reebusacassafram.

DUBNER: Good. Right. So, that is a phrase that was invented that was by some genius. I don’t know who. I do know where I learned to say this was from the former dean of students at Darmouth and he was always getting in these conversations in passing where he had to have the response but he had no idea what the person was talking about. It might have been talking about a relative of yours or a former encounter. I could see you using this a lot. And you want to say something on your way out, you don’t want to be rude but you have no idea what the response is. If you say “reebusacassafram,” the human ear will interpret that in one of a hundred different ways and they will almost certainly think that you actually said something real when you didn’t.

Freakonomics
That’s a Great Question! (Ep. 192 Rebroadcast)
Verbal tic or strategic rejoinder? Whatever the case: it’s rare to come across an interview these days where at least one question isn’t a “great” one.

Corporate Earnest Songwriting – Genre

Label for song I heard while getting coffee, at place other than Starbucks. Didn’t catch the words but the singer was conveying an overwhelming sense of emotion.  Not my cup of tea, but I guess it’s better than Smooth Jazz.