We Live in Rebel Occupied Territory – C.S. Lewis Quote

“But I freely admit that real Christianity (as distinct from Christianity-and-water) goes much nearer to Dualism than people think. One of the things that surprised me when I first read the New Testament seriously was that it talked so much about a Dark Power in the universe—a mighty evil spirit who was held to be the Power behind death and disease, and sin. The difference is that Christianity thinks this Dark Power was created by God, and was good when he was created, and went wrong. Christianity agrees with Dualism that this universe is at war. But it does not think this is a war between independent powers. It thinks it is a civil war, a rebellion, and that we are living in a part of the universe occupied by the rebel.

Enemy-occupied territory—that is what this world is. Christianity is the story of how the rightful king has landed, you might say landed in disguise, and is calling us all to take part in a great campaign of sabotage.”

Lewis, C. S.. Mere Christianity

Missed Shows are Always the Greatest Shows

I was thinking about going to see the Throwing Muses once but didn’t because I didn’t want to drive from Fort Collins to Boulder. A year after the fact I talked to a guy who did go and he said it was the best show he’d ever been to.

I once worked with a guy who had the chance to see Nirvana but didn’t because he was going to catch them when they came around in the summer and then Cobain committed suicide.

I once took the day off from work to go see the Screaming Trees. (I was working nights.) Go to the venue and they had cancelled. I guess they could be hit or miss but supposedly when they were *on* they were amazing.

In March the Voice ran a cover story titled “Why We Hate the Subways,” and everyone had their own tales. Me, I’d been mugged on trains a few times, twice at knifepoint, coming home from Manhattan shows alone at night. But the worst was in May, when I was stuck on a broken-down E train for an hour en route to the Port Authority Bus Terminal to meet a girl I was cross-eyed crushed-out on. She had tickets to see the Grateful Dead five hours north that night, at Cornell University’s Barton Hall. When I finally arrived, the girl and the bus—the last Ithaca run of the day—were gone. I was more upset about missing the girl. But in time, via magnetic tape, Barton Hall 5/8/77 would enter Dead lore as arguably the single greatest show the band ever played. Fucking subway.

Hermes, Will. Love Goes to Buildings on Fire
Amazon

Online Learning – Letters to Editor of NY Times

Veronique highlights some of the benefits that remote learning can bring. But she neglects the reality that it advantages some students over others and exacerbates existing societal inequities.

The students who get the most out of remote learning tend to be self-directed and/or able to get guidance and support from parents or other family members. Special education students and English-language learners who need more intensive one-on-one supports often struggle with online learning, as do students who live in crowded quarters where constant distractions are present. And of course there are many students who lack access to computers or the internet, making online learning an impossibility.

Lessons for the Future From Online Learning
Should schools incorporate more virtual learning when they reopen? Students and educators respond to one student’s enthusiasm for it.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/30/opinion/letters/coronavirus-online-education.html

Music Business Economics

We recently had a fun post about Hollywood accounting, about how the movie industry makes sure even big hit movies “lose money” on paper. So how about the recording industry? Well, they’re pretty famous for doing something quite similar. Reader Jay pointed out in the comments an article from The Root that goes through who gets paid what for music sales, and the basic answer is not the musician. That report suggests that for every $1,000 sold, the average musician gets $23.40.

RIAA Accounting: Why Even Major Label Musicians Rarely Make Money From Album Sales

Mike Masnick
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20100712/23482610186.shtml

Recoup

Dig!

Tracks the tumultuous rise of two talented musicians, Anton Newcombe, leader of the Brian Jonestown Massacre, and Courtney Taylor, leader of the Dandy Warhols, and dissects their star-crossed friendship and bitter rivalry. Both are hell-bent on staging a self-proclaimed revolution of the music industry. Through their loves and obsessions, gigs and recordings, arrests and death threats, uppers and downers, and ultimately to their chance at a piece of the profit-driven music business. How each handles his stab at “success” is where the relationship frays and burns.

Rotten Tomatoes

Aes Triplex, Robert Louis Stevenson

As courage and intelligence are the two qualities best worth a good man’s cultivation, so it is the first part of intelligence to recognise our precarious estate in life, and the first part of courage to be not at all abashed before the fact. A frank and somewhat headlong carriage, not looking too anxiously before, not dallying in maudlin regret over the past, stamps the man who is well armoured for this world.

And not only well armoured for himself, but a good friend and a good citizen to boot. We do not go to cowards for tender dealing; there is nothing so cruel as panic; the man who has least fear for his own carcass, has most time to consider others.

Aes Triplex, by Robert Louis Stevenson.
Check out the whole thing at Project Gutenberg

Quarantine Watchlist

Pickpocket
The Outsider
David Crosby – Remember My Name
Friends of Eddie Coyle
The Wanderers
The Atlanta Child Murders
The Secrets of Nimh
Let the Right One In
La Jetee
Angel Heart
Fast, Cheap, and Out of Control
Peterloo
Monty Python and the Holy Grail
Cloud Atlas
Jack Reacher
808
Mulholland Drive
Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead
Withnail & I
Touch of Evil
Tender Mercies
Popcorn
Cromwell
Idiocracy
The Day of the Jackal
A Place at the Table
Dig!

Movies and Tv shows watched from March 13 through July 5

Independence Day – 2020

Independence Day (colloquially the Fourth of July or July 4) is a federal holiday in the United States commemorating the Declaration of Independence of the United States, on July 4, 1776. The Continental Congress declared that the thirteen American colonies were no longer subject (and subordinate) to the monarch of Britain, King George III, and were now united, free, and independent states. The Congress had voted to declare independence two days earlier, on July 2, but it was not declared until July 4.

800px-Fourth_of_July_fireworks_behind_the_Washington_Monument,_1986

Wikipedia

Concord Hymn

Sung at the Completion of the Battle Monument, July 4, 1837
By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
   Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled,
Here once the embattled farmers stood
   And fired the shot heard round the world.
The foe long since in silence slept;
   Alike the conqueror silent sleeps;
And Time the ruined bridge has swept
   Down the dark stream which seaward creeps.
On this green bank, by this soft stream,
   We set today a votive stone;
That memory may their deed redeem,
   When, like our sires, our sons are gone.
Spirit, that made those heroes dare
   To die, and leave their children free,
Bid Time and Nature gently spare
   The shaft we raise to them and thee.

 

Ralph Waldo Emerson

via https://www.poetryfoundation.org/

Acts of Kindness, examples


What’s a small act of kindness you were once shown, that you’ll never forget? from AskReddit

plantlifer
I missed my train to go home for Christmas from uni due to a crash near the station. I was completely broke and knew I wouldn’t be able to afford another ticket. Life just got on top of me knowing I’d have to spend Christmas alone in my shitty student house and not being about to see my grandad who was in rapidly declining health. I was bawling my eyes out on the platfrom when a janitor(?) appeared out of a hidden stock room under a stair well and brought me some tissues.

He found out why I was so upset and said leave it to me. Took me to the customer service desk and got them to reissue me a ticket for the next train home. I was so thankful I started bawling again and he went on his way. Then just before I was about to get my train he found me on the platform and gave me some snacks and a can of coke and its just the nicest thing anyones ever done for it.

Mads_83
I broke my foot and was trying to limp my way across campus with crutches in the pouring rain. Someone ran over with their umbrella and walked across campus with me so I wouldn’t get rained on.

COBNYC
I was in NYC taking a lunch break at a job I absolutely hated. I was sitting eating alone at a McD’s and after about 15 minutes this man in his 40’s or 50’s (I’m a 28 yr old male at the time) goes up to me and says something like “Hey man, you look really sad. Things will get better.” and just shook my hand. Takes a lot for one adult man to offer that up to another strange man. Really cheered me up.

cranberryboggle
After my Dad passed away my depression kicked into over drive. I went to the Doctor and got a prescription for anti depressants. While I was picking up my prescription I started crying. When I apologized to the pharmacist for crying like a child the pharmacist said, ” You don’t have to apologize. You recognize you have a problem and you are trying to fix it. That is a brave thing.” It changed my perspective on treating my mental illness.

PhreedomPhighter
At work I was complaining about heartburn once. I was still pretty new to the job. Didnt really have any work friends. Felt like an outsider. My life outside of work was pretty shit as well.

The bartender on shift overheard me and ran to a nearby coffee shop to get me a chocolate milk. It definitely made the heartburn go away but it was such a needlessly kind act. I dont think ill ever forget it. 2 years later we’re still friends and she is definitely one of the kindest people I’ve ever met.

At a Texas Foundry, An Indifference to Life. NY Times 2003

It is said that only the desperate seek work at Tyler Pipe, a sprawling, rusting pipe foundry out on Route 69, just past the flea market. Behind a high metal fence lies a workplace that is part Dickens and part Darwin, a dim, dirty, hellishly hot place where men are regularly disfigured by amputations and burns, where turnover is so high that convicts are recruited from local prisons, where some workers urinate in their pants because their bosses refuse to let them step away from the manufacturing line for even a few moments.


On June 29, 2000, in his second month on the job, Mr. Hoskin descended into a deep pit under a huge molding machine and set to work on an aging, balky conveyor belt that carried sand. Federal rules require safety guards on conveyor belts to prevent workers from getting caught and crushed. They also require belts to be shut down when maintenance is done on them.

But this belt was not shut down, federal records show. Nor was it protected by metal safety guards. That very night, Mr. Hoskin had been trained to adjust the belt while it was still running. Less downtime that way, the men said. Now it was about 4 a.m., and Mr. Hoskin was alone in the cramped, dark pit. The din was deafening, the footing treacherous under heavy drifts of black sand.

He was found on his knees. His left arm had been crushed first, the skin torn off. His head had been pulled between belt and rollers. His skull had split.

At a Texas Foundry, An Indifference to Life
David Barstow and Lowell Bergman
NYTIMES

Actor Clark Middleton Interview

You have said that your wish for people with arthritis is that they not be defined by their disability, but empowered by it.

You have to take the lead, redefine your narrative. Disabilities certainly create obstacles, but how you interpret those obstacles can become a creative act. I work in a business where one’s appearance matters, at first, perhaps more than anything else. However, people get to know you, your character and confidence, how you transform a room or engage others. Those factors can change how people see you. Not because of, but in spite of our disabilities.

Actor Clark Middleton Shares Insight Into His Shows, The Path and The Blacklist
Jeryl Brunner
Parade

Short Timeline of Events – The American Revolution’s Beginning

March 5, 1770: Boston Massacre
In Boston, a small British army detachment that was threatened by mob harassment opened fire and killed five people, an incident soon known as the Boston Massacre. The soldiers were charged with murder and were given a civilian trial, in which John Adams conducted a successful defense.

April 18–19, 1775: Paul Revere’s Ride and the Battles of Lexington and Concord
On the night of April 18, 1775, Paul Revere rode from Charlestown to Lexington (both in Massachusetts) to warn that the British were marching from Boston to seize the colonial armory at Concord. En route, the British force of 700 men was met on Lexington Green by 77 local minutemen and others. It is unclear who fired the first shot, but it sparked a skirmish that left eight Americans dead. At Concord, the British were met by hundreds of militiamen. Outnumbered and running low on ammunition, the British column was forced to retire to Boston. On the return march, American snipers took a deadly toll on the British. Total losses in the Battles of Lexington and Concord numbered 273 British and more than 90 Americans.

June 17, 1775: Battle of Bunker Hill
Breed’s Hill in Charlestown was the primary locus of combat in the misleadingly named Battle of Bunker Hill, which was part of the American siege of British-held Boston. Some 2,300 British troops eventually cleared the hill of the entrenched Americans, but at the cost of more than 40 percent of the assault force. The battle was a moral victory for the Americans.

July 3, 1775: Washington assumed command of the Continental Army in Cambridge

Washington_at_Cambridge_1925_Issue-2c

July 4, 1776: Declaration of Independence adopted
After the Congress recommended that colonies form their own governments, the Declaration of Independence was written by Thomas Jefferson and revised in committee. On July 2 the Congress voted for independence; on July 4 it adopted the Declaration of Independence.

https://www.britannica.com/list/timeline-of-the-american-revolution