Tag: Film

10 Important / Noteworthy / Memorable / Interesting Documentaries

The Times of Harvey Milk – 1984
A documentary of the successful career and assassination of San Francisco’s first elected gay city supervisor.

Paris is Burning – 1990
A chronicle of New York’s drag scene in the 1980s, focusing on balls, voguing and the ambitions and dreams of those who gave the era its warmth and vitality.

Incident at Oglala – 1992
This film describes the events surrounding a 1975 shootout at the Pine Ridge reservation in S. Dakota where two FBI agents were killed.

Crumb – 1994
An intimate portrait of controversial cartoonist Robert Crumb and his traumatized family.

Hoop Dreams – 1994
A film following the lives of two inner-city Chicago boys who struggle to become college basketball players on the road to going professional.

Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills – 1996
A horrific triple child murder leads to an indictment and trial of three nonconformist boys based on questionable evidence.

Filth and the Fury – 2000
A film about the career of the notorious punk rock band, the Sex Pistols.

Sunshine Hotel – 2001
A portrait of one of the few remaining men only ‘flophouses’ on New York City’s infamous skid row, the Bowery.

Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room – 2005
A documentary about the Enron corporation, its faulty and corrupt business practices, and how they led to its fall.

I’m Not Your Negro – 2016
Writer James Baldwin tells the story of race in modern America with his unfinished novel, Remember This House.

This Is Where We Came In – Old Time Movie Watching

Where was I? Oh, yes. Films. It is hard to believe that my parents’ generation would walk into a cinema when it suited them, without paying any attention to what film it was that they were going to see. Indeed they weren’t even concerned whether the film had just started, or was halfway through, or was in the middle of the final chase sequence. They would just happily settle into their seats with their sweets and cigarettes and start trying to decipher the plot, and who was the villain, and why everybody was in Hamburg, and then the film would end, and they would sit patiently through the advertisements and newsreels, eat an ice cream, and then the film would begin again, and they would finally discover who everyone was, and why they had all gone to Hamburg, and at exactly the moment when they’d understood what the hell was going on, and could now enjoy the denouement, they’d all shout, “Oh! This is where we came in!”— and leave. How are you supposed to write for an audience like that? The great farce-writer Ben Travers once told me that in the ’30s, posh “country people” would invariably arrive in their seats at the back of the stalls about twenty minutes late (to show that they were not bound by the trivial conventions of the proletariat) and that he therefore always added a brief summary of the plot at that point, so the toffs could get up to speed. But Ben at least knew roughly when they’d be arriving. Did the “Oh! This is where we came in!” brigade ever consider why they liked watching a movie in the wrong order? Well, not my parents, anyway.

Cleese, John. So, Anyway…

Highest Grossing Films of 1990

Highest-grossing films of 1990

1 Ghost Paramount $505,702,588
2 Home Alone Fox $476,684,675
3 Pretty Woman Disney $463,406,268
4 Dances with Wolves Orion $424,208,848
5 Total Recall Sony / Carolco $261,317,921
6 Back to the Future Part III Universal $244,527,583
7 Die Hard 2 Fox $240,031,094
8 Presumed Innocent Warner Bros. $221,303,188
9 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles New Line $201,965,915
10 Kindergarten Cop Universal $201,957,688

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1990_in_film#Highest-grossing_films

Seeing Your Life Onscreen – Aaron Sorkin Discusses The Social Network – Deadline Interview

DEADLINE: We know Mark Zuckerberg didn’t cooperate but did you ever meet Eduardo Saverin, the character played by Andrew Garfield?
SORKIN: Once Eduardo signed that non-disclosure agreement after his settlement, he disappeared off the face of the earth. We don’t know exactly how much he received, but it’s in the hundreds of millions. And it will probably go over a billion because he also does now own a lot of Facebook stock. But on October 1st, the movie opened and that’s the day I met Eduardo. I got a phone call from our producer Scott Rudin that a representative for Eduardo had contacted him late at night. He wanted to see the movie. So we set up a private screening for him in New York right before Lady Gaga’s private screening. It’s true. I went to meet him when the movie was over and you could have performed surgery on him without anesthesia at that point in time. I gotta say, he was a deer in the headlights which is an understatement. He did certainly expect to like the movie a lot, but you could tell in his face that he had just relived the thing. It’s an unreasonable experience that hardly anybody, including myself, knows what it’s like to have a chapter from your life suddenly written, directed, lit, shot, and performed by actors. That was the first and only time I met Eduardo.

Deadline

Michael Apted Interview – Fresh Air

Every seven years since 1964, in what’s known as the Up series, Granada Television has caught us up on the lives of 14 everyday people. The subjects of the documentary series were 7 years old when it began; in the latest installment, 56 Up, they are well into middle age.

Apted on what this experience has been like for him

“What can I say? I mean, it’s the favorite thing I’ve ever done, the thing I’m most proud of. It’s nerve-wracking, because you think you’re always going to blow it and you’ll wreck the whole thing. It seems fragile, and I’ve learned a lot of lessons about it. I’ve made mistakes on it and had to correct those mistakes. You know, particularly I got into a situation, I think, early on where I became judgmental about people — that if they didn’t agree with my standards of success, failure, happiness, whatever, then I would feel they were the lesser for it. And also I try to play God. I try to predict what might happen to people, and sort of set it all up for that. And I did that, and that was an embarrassing mistake. And I think what I’ve learned all the way through is the less I do, the better.”

Fresh Air

Nominate a Movie / Movies for the National Film Registry

Nominations are now being accepted for the 2020 Registry
The 2020 deadline for nominations is September 15, 2020.

The Library of Congress invites you to submit your recommendations for movies to be included on the 2020 National Film Registry. Public nominations play a key role when the Librarian and Film Board are considering their final selections. To be eligible for the Registry, a film must be at least 10 years old and be “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

Registry criteria does not specifically prohibit television programs, commercials, music videos or foreign productions, however, the original intent of the legislation that established the Registry was to safeguard U.S. films. Consequently the National Film Preservation Board and the Librarian of Congress give first consideration to American motion pictures.

The Registry is intended to reflect American society and the rich tapestry of American cinema since its inceptions around 1890. To that end, we strongly encourage the nomination of the full-range of American film-making: not just Hollywood classics or other well-known works, but also silent era titles, documentaries, avant-garde, educational and industrial films, as well as films representing the vibrant unmatched diversity of American culture, both in terms of content and all those who created these snapshots of America society: directors, writers, actors and actresses, cinematographers, and other crafts.

Looking for ideas on possible films to nominate? Check here for hundreds of titles not yet selected to the National Film Registry. View the complete list of films currently on the Registry.

You may recommend up to 50 titles per year through our online nomination form..

Library of Congress

Peterloo

The Peterloo Massacre took place at St Peter’s Field, Manchester, Lancashire, England on Monday 16 August 1819. On this day, cavalry charged into a crowd of around 60,000 people, who had gathered to demand the reform of parliamentary representation.

After the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815 there was an acute economic slump, accompanied by chronic unemployment and harvest failure, and exacerbated by the Corn Laws which kept the price of bread high. At that time only around 11% of adult males had the vote, very few of them in the industrial north which was worst hit, and reformers identified parliamentary reform as the solution. A mass campaign to petition parliament for manhood suffrage gained three-quarters of a million signatures in 1817 but was flatly rejected by the House of Commons. When a second slump occurred in early 1819, radical reformers sought to mobilise huge crowds to force government to back down. The movement was particularly strong in the north-west of England, where the Manchester Patriotic Union organised a mass rally in August 1819 addressed by well-known radical orator Henry Hunt.

Shortly after the meeting began, local magistrates called on the Manchester and Salford Yeomanry to arrest Hunt and several others on the platform with him. The Yeomanry charged into the crowd, knocking down a woman and killing a child, and finally apprehended Hunt. Cheshire Magistrates chairman William Hulton then summoned the 15th Hussars to disperse the crowd. They charged with sabres drawn, and 9-15 people were killed and 400–700 were injured in the ensuing confusion. The event was first labelled the “Peterloo massacre” by the radical Manchester Observer newspaper, in a bitterly ironic reference to the bloody Battle of Waterloo, which had taken place four years earlier.

Wikipedia

Truffaut, François. The Films in My Life – quote from and epigraph

When I was a critic, I thought that a successful film had simultaneously to express an idea of the world and an idea of cinema; La Règle du Jeu and Citizen Kane corresponded to this definition perfectly. Today, I demand that a film express either the joy of making cinema or the agony of making cinema. I am not at all interested in anything in between; I am not interested in all those films that do not pulse.

Epigraph:
I believe a work is good to the degree that it expresses the man who created it.
ORSON WELLES

These books were alive and they spoke to me.
HENRY MILLER, The Books in My Life

Truffaut, François. The Films in My Life
Amazon

‘L.A. Confidential’: The ultimate filming locations map

From Los Feliz to Long Beach, the 1997 classic exposes rot beneath the glamour of Los Angeles

 

“I remember the first time I got off the plane in LA. I came up to Hollywood, on La Brea or La Cienega, I can’t remember, through the oil fields,” says L.A. Confidential production designer Jeannine Oppewall. “And I thought to myself: ‘What the hell kind of city is this, with oil fields in the middle of it?’”

For Oppewall, who spoke to Curbed LA on the eve of the 1997 neo-noir’s 20th anniversary, the illusory romance of the City of Angels was stripped away in an instant. That’s what the movie does too, puncturing our inflated ideas of Old Hollywood glamour by plumbing the psychological depths of its key characters and (sometimes literally) exposing the rot underneath.

By Chris Eggertsen, la.curbed.com