Tag: Housing

Homeless in LA

Homeless service providers and advocates have mixed feelings about a new order from a federal judge that Los Angeles must provide shelter to all unhoused people living on Skid Row by the fall.

In a rare move, Judge David Carter said LA’s decades of bad policy decisions have contributed to a disaster that can only be solved by forcing the city’s hand. But other legal experts see the order as getting the diagnosis right, but the remedy wrong.

Here & Now‘s Tonya Mosley talks about the nuances with Andy Bales, CEO of Union Rescue Mission, and Eric Tars, legal director for the National Homelessness Law Center.

Average Denver Home Price Hits $674K, Up $40K in a Month

Average Denver Home Price Hits $674K, Up $40K in a Month from r/Denver

nmesunimportnt
Median home price is a much better measure since it is less skewed by huge transactions at the top end. Median is still bad at ~$560,000.

Ecredes
The same report has median stats too, up 30k since last month.

EvergreenSea
Sheesh. That’s bad news for us wannabe homeowners.

jballs
Seriously, how do people just starting off afford houses now? I’m lucky enough to have bought our first place 13 years ago when it was still possible to by a place with a 2 in the starting digit. How can people just starting out even hope to buy a house for half a million dollars minimum?

solidtwerks
Is everyone up to the eyeballs in debt?

lhturbo
its a lot of out of state money coming in. Sell their home in Cali or New york for way more value and pay cash here.

meissho1
And I imagine investment firms as well just gobbling up properties so they can rent them out at exorbitant rates.

Urban Development, Some Problems With

The Californians Are Coming. So Is Their Housing Crisis.
Is it possible to import growth without also importing housing problems? “I can’t point to a city that has done it right.”
NYTIMES

From the comments section:

The problem with multi-family dwellings in the US is that there are insufficient noise-mitigation requirements. This leads to unlivable situations and neighbors at war with one another…

Income inequality deserves more than a passing mention, and acceptance as a fact of life. The housing-affordability problem is more about wage suppression than housing costs. Median income has stagnated since 1980, even has labor productivity has continued to rise. Nearly all the gains from income growth have gone to the top 10%, and most of that has gone to the top 1%…

Our immediate neighbors, however, are mostly terrible. Noisy, rude, filthy, not to mention brashly flouting public health law which affects us all when living in small spaces. The sidewalks are covered in broken glass and debris. My BIPOC daughters are sexually harassed if they walk in the wrong direction. We have hit-and-runs on a regular basis…

US population:
1970: 205m
1980: 226m
1990: 250m
2000: 282m
2010: 309m
2020: 330m

Plus, the comprehensive planning (and no mass transit) we have is a joke. We’re well on our way to becoming any western sprawling area. At least some of the foothills were saved.
Once you’ve lured people to a place, which the city of Boise has done with its PR firms for the past 15 years, you can’t turn them away. So for me the question is: can’t you build better?…

All it takes is one noisy neighbor constantly ruining the peace and quiet in your own home. I’d live in a cardboard box before I’d return to a situation where I’d be vulnerable to that again….

As a California who currently lives in Montana, the sentiment is palpable. I no longer tell people where I am from and have experienced instances of discrimination from repairmen to hairstylists when calling from a California area code.

The biggest problem that causes the housing problem is good public transportation. If we had a system like anywhere else in the world then people would not be in a pickle with having to live close to work. No need to own so many cars. We can actually walk on the present almost non-existent sidewalks. There can be more family friendly neighborhood parks with BENCHES. I find it so strange that we cannot take our elderly parents to green areas here due to lack of seating.

California Exiles and the Housing Crisis

But there is another factor at play: Californians, fleeing high home prices, are moving to Idaho in droves. For the past several years, Idaho has been one of the fastest-growing states, with the largest share of new residents coming from California. This fact can be illustrated with census data, moving vans — or resentment.

Home prices rose 20 percent in 2020, according to Zillow, and in Boise, “Go Back to California” graffiti has been sprayed along the highways. The last election cycle was a referendum on growth and housing, and included a fringe mayoral candidate who campaigned on a promise to keep Californians out. The dichotomy between growth and its discontents has fused the city’s politics and collective consciousness with a question that city leaders around the country were asking even before the pandemic and remote work trends accelerated relocation: Is it possible to import California’s growth without also importing its housing problems?

“I can’t point to a city that has done it right,” said Lauren McLean, Boise’s Democratic mayor.

That’s because as bad as California’s affordable housing problem is, it isn’t really a California problem. It is a national one. From rising homelessness to anti-development sentiment to frustration among middle-class workers who’ve been locked out of the housing market, the same set of housing issues has bubbled up in cities across the country. They’ve already visited Boise, NashvilleDenver and Austin, Texas, and many other high-growth cities. And they will become even more widespread as remote workers move around.

NYTIMES

Leasing Apartment – Paperwork

Please DocuSign
Form: APARTMENT LEASE FORM,
Form: PARKING ADDENDUM,
Form: REMOTE CONTROL, CARD OR CODE ACCESS GATE ADDENDUM,
Form: MOLD INFORMATION AND PREVENTION ADDENDUM,
Form: NO-SMOKING ADDENDUM,
Form: PEST CONTROL ADDENDUM,
Form: RENTER’S OR LIABILITY INSURANCE ADDENDUM,
Form: SATELLITE DISH OR ANTENNA ADDENDUM,
Form: SMOKE AND CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR ADDENDUM,
Form: ADDENDUM REGARDING MEDICAL MARIJUANA USE AND LANDLORD’S COMMITMENT TO ENFORCEMENT OF CRIME/DRU,
Form: ALL-IN-ONE UTILITY ADDENDUM,
Form: BED BUG ADDENDUM,
Form: COMMUNITY POLICIES, RULES, & REGULATIONS,
Form: CRIME/DRUG FREE HOUSING ADDENDUM,
Form: ANIMAL ADDENDUM,
Form: PACKAGE ACCEPTANCE ADDENDUM,
Form: SHORT-TERM SUBLETTING OR RENTAL PROHIBITED,
Form: PHOTO, VIDEO, AND STATEMENT RELEASE ADDENDUM,
Form: COLORADO GAS & ELECTRIC SUBMETERING ADDENDUM

Roommate Food Theft Investigation

We had a roommate stealing food situation too. There were 4 of us, the first 2 didn’t have their food stolen before, I’m the 3rd one moving in but whom everyone could see I buy my own food, and a 4th guy who moved in around the same time as me but always hung out in the living room. It was obvious who was stealing, but none of us had proof, nor was there anything we could do about it anyway, until I had a flu once and decided to buy orange juice to be healthy, but because it was for only me, I drank straight from the jug. A few days later the 4th guy and only the 4th guy caught the flu…

https://www.reddit.com/r/PublicFreakout/comments/jlf1jm/ever_had_your_lunch_stolen_at_work/

Group Living Rules – Denver Zoning

After an eight-hour meeting that included a public comment period for which 74 people signed up to speak, the Planning Board voted eight in favor (with one member not voting) to forward the proposal to City Council for review. City Council is expected to take it up in October.

Hundreds of people sent written comments to the board ahead of its decision. For months, residents have aired such concerns as fear of having former prisoners as neighbors. People who share housing have pushed for their arrangements to be legitimized.

The proposed zoning code change includes increasing the number of adults who aren’t related who can legally share a single-family home from two to five, with larger homes allowed to harbor as many as 10.

Jason Hornyak told the Planning Board that the changes would allow younger people to do what he did not know was illegal when he arrived in Denver as a recent college graduate: pool resources with others to be able to afford a home and start a life here. Referring to the city Community Planning and Development department that created the amendment, Hornyak said: “Cheers to CPD for making Denver a more equitable city.”

Donna Bryson, August 19, 2020
Denverite

Denver has an immediate need for housing, and the city has made it a priority to address that need by working to make more options available for all residents. Updating zoning rules is one piece of the city’s overall strategy to provide more and better housing opportunities for all residents.

denvergov.org

Affordable housing can cost $1 million per unit in California

Affordable housing can cost $1 million per unit in California due to is California’s labyrinthine financing process, parking minimums, and local governments forcing developers to cut number of apartments per building from urbanplanning

Lazerus42
My home town West Los Angeles is terrible at this. Parking is atrocious, and so is the ability to rezone single resident to multi floor apartments, or even apartment complex. We understandably don’t allow new developements to happen without built in parking now, but that then creates a city of high end apartments being the only thing people want to develop. So parking is a stigma of the issues. Of course public transportation is big for many metropolises, but LA is big, like big big. Public transportation is good, but bad in LA.. lots of NIMBY stopping the way. (look at trying to pass a trolley line near Beverly Hills High School) So this leads to a realm of housing that is damn near impossible to afford. I don’t quite know what to do. I’m not an expert in any way. It’s just what I’ve come to understand is the issue.

wizardnamehere
The cause is a lack of public transport. But transport projects are rendered unviable by the large ownership and preference to cars. You have to tackle the issue from both ends. You also need planning policy which aims to reduce total trips taken outside the local area. —

Housing Affordability in Amsterdam

VAN DOORNINCK:

I think where we’re doing bad is that the prices of our houses are far too high. The biggest worry that people in Amsterdam have is, “Can I pay my rent, or can I pay my mortgage, or actually, can I live in Amsterdam?” Because it’s so expensive. And that is such a strange thing because we calculate our G.D.P., so how wealthy the city is, by the prices of our houses. So, we say, “Okay, we have very expensive houses, so we are doing well. We’re a rich city.” But actually, we’re saying, “There’s no access for a lot of young people, but also older people because it’s far too expensive.” So, how could we say that our city is doing well?

freakonomics