Tag: How We Live Now

Samuel Paty

French President Emmanuel Macron has paid tribute to “quiet hero” Samuel Paty, the teacher who was beheaded last Friday.

Mr Paty was targeted close to his school near Paris for showing cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in class.

His killer, 18-year-old Abdullakh Anzorov, was shot dead by police.

Speaking at a televised memorial service on Wednesday, Mr Macron told viewers that France “will not give up our cartoons”.

The service was attended by the teacher’s family and some 400 guests.

The coffin was brought into the ceremony on the shoulders of a guard of honour and to the sound of the song “One” by the rock group U2.

On top of the casket was Mr Paty’s Légion d’Honneur, France’s highest honour. It was posthumously awarded to Mr Paty.

BBC

Judge Halts Trump Foodstamp Cutback

A federal judge struck down a Trump administration rule that would have reduced food stamp benefits to nearly 700,000 people.

In her Sunday ruling, U.S. District Court Chief Judge Beryl Howell wrote that implementing the change “radically and abruptly alters decades of regulatory practice, leaving States scrambling and exponentially increasing food insecurity for tens of thousands of Americans.”

Tim Fitzsimons
NBC NEWS

Context Collapse

As social beings, we adapt our communication to the situation at hand — the “context”.

If you’re a 25 year old student attending University, then you probably talk about different topics, use a different vocabulary, phrase yourself differently and in general behave differently in these situations:

  • A thanksgiving dinner with your parents, siblings and grandparents.
  • A pub-crawl with friends your own age that you study with.
  • A private conversation with a small handful of close friends of yours.
  • A political meeting discussing policy in a political party you’re a member of.
  • Colleagues and/or bosses that you talk to during your part-time job.

Context collapse is what happens when all these widely different social contexts all collide.

If you share something on Facebook with the default “Friends” setting, then you’re effectively sharing it with ALL of the groups above and more. Your different contexts have collapsed and become one; and you might find that you don’t have a lot to say that you’d really like to share with ALL of these people.

Quora

Cost of Health Care in the US – Some People’s Experiences

Trump Took Credit for Making Insulin “So Cheap It’s Like Water.” Tell That to People Paying For It. from politics

BOOFIN_FART_TRIANGLE
With good insurance my insulin, pump, and glucometer supplies cost over 650 per month.

REO_Jerkwagon
Pretty much. I didn’t mind my insurance at my old job. Never went to the doctor either. When I *did* end up having to have stomach surgery, I quickly learned to hate my insurance company. Tried to tell me hernia repair was fucking elective.

foxnkatz
Yeah that’s ridiculous. A similar thing happened when my wife had appendicitis. They said it was going to burst and as such would have to remove it. Insurance tried to tell her it was elective so they wouldn’t be covering the $77,000 hospital stay. Very crazy.

Deadsolidperfect
I’m a teacher and my insurance SUCKS! I had to pay 10k out of pocket 2 yrs in a row for random medical issues. We have a lot of teachers that are much better off on their spouse’s plan. I’d love to see what a good plan looks like

scrapmoneybenny
It costs $6 for a 3 month supply of insulin, here in Australia. That’s what’s cheaper than water is Trump, not $300 a week 

BOOFIN_FART_TRIANGLE
There are people from the United States in Southern California that open up pharmacies in Tijuana Mexico specifically for the diabetic market in San Diego. In Mexico, they can sell all types of insulins for pennies on the dollar. Less than what a copay is in the United States with excellent insurance. People drive down there and buy insulin, from a pharmacy owned by someone that lives in the US, for cheaper than what they can get it in the US for. It’s stupid.
… Decent plans disappeared long before the aca. They were well on their way out in The late 90s and early 00s (prolly even before that). I owned a business around 2004, and the overhead for employees to get healthcare was so astronomical, that it’s literally the only reason why we kept everyone as private contractors.

Quesoleader
I had the gall bladder removed about four years ago. Still paying off the 20k portion of my bill. It was more (45k) before I fought them over “choosing” out of network doctors when the hospital emergency room I went to was in network.

The Cost of Inequality: $42,000 per Median US Worker – Non Profit News | Nonprofit Quarterly

https://nonprofitquarterly.org/the-cost-of-inequality-42000-per-median-us-worker/

… the question that Eric Levitz poses in New York Magazine is provocative. And the data, certainly, illustrate the severity of the income shift that has taken place over the past 45 years.

Specifically, Levitz examines a study by Carter Price and Kathryn Edwards from the Rand Corporation. And, yes, that is the same Rand Corporation of Pentagon Papers fame, so it’s fair to call it an establishment-based source. Anyhow, Price and Edwards in their study, which was conducted in partnership with the Fair Work Center, ask the following question: If the share of worker income to total income were the same in 2018 as in 1975, and growth was the same, how much would the median worker earn in 2018?

The answer: $92,000. That’s a full $42,000 greater than the actual 2018 median worker income, which was $50,000.

Steve Dubb
The Cost of Inequality: $42,000 per Median US Worker
NONPROFIT QUARTERLY

What People are Paying for Health Insurance

In California, one person told me that the cheapest insurance they could find — for one person, with very little coverage and a high deductible — goes for $330 a month.

I talked to a dog walker in Seattle who pays $675 — without dental coverage.

Another person reported that their bargain basement plan in Minnesota costs $250 a month.

In Dallas, $378 a month for a catastrophic plan with a $10,000 deductible.

And that’s if there’s just one of you: A freelance writer told me she’d had breast cancer, and her husband, a freelance photographer and photo editor, is an insulin- dependent Type 2 diabetic. They live in suburban New York, and currently pay $1,484 a month for coverage.

Anne Helen Petersen, BuzzFeed
How The Gig Economy Screwed Over Millennials

Opinion | Disdain for the Less Educated Is the Last Acceptable Prejudice – The New York Times

At the heart of this project are two ideas: First, in a global, technological age, higher education is the key to upward mobility, material success and social esteem. Second, if everyone has an equal chance to rise, those who land on top deserve the rewards their talents bring.

This way of thinking is so familiar that it seems to define the American dream. But it has come to dominate our politics only in recent decades. And despite its inspiring promise of success based on merit, it has a dark side.

Disdain for the Less Educated Is the Last Acceptable Prejudice
It’s having a corrosive effect on American life — and hurting the Democratic Party.
Michael J. Sandel

Hot Mic Stories – Education in the Time of Covid

Students/Teachers of Reddit, what’s the best ‘forgot to turn off the mic’ story during virtual learning? from r/AskReddit

Odd_Camera_9588
Ironically my IT teacher forgot to turn of his mic and camera and proceeded to get in a very heated argument on the phone with his ex-girlfriend who he has a kid with. Did I mention that she’s also a teacher at our school? Yeah most awkward 5 minutes of my life before he realised

WorldTheAround
Any entertaining details from the argument?

Odd_Camera_9588
Not really from the actual argument, just a lot of swearing, but when he realised she said ‘great, you can’t even do the job you’re barely qualified to do in the first place’

Unknown_user_12
Well, it happened in one of the classes.

The teacher was going through a rough time and the class could feel it. We assured her that we had done our homework and that she could take rest for the time being. She agreed and told she would switch her mic off and sleep for a while, as we did whatever.

Her husband was right beside her and the mic wasn’t turned off. She told, ” I am so lucky to have these students” and started sobbing to her husband. We all heard this, but kept quiet to prevent her being embarrassed.

She slept well during that time and we sent her a thank you gift collectively.

bingbong1234
I was producing a video for some university professors on a specific medical thing for a virtual learning course. I was all set up to shoot the process, and the teachers excused themselves to the next office to regroup and have a chat. I already had their wireless lav mics attached and fed to my camera, so when I sat down at the camera and put on my headphones I immediately heard their conversation – they were criticizing me, saying they couldn’t believe they hired someone so young, inexperienced in that particular medical field, how I looked, how I asked questions, etc… Oops! At least I made them a fine video. These days I don’t put my headphones on until we’re about to shoot.

Large_Dr_Pepper  
One of my professors classes had a student say something like “I just joined 5 minutes before class and this asshole is already teaching.”

The professor just laughed and told him his mic was on.

Lack of Housing and Overcrowding in Silicon Valley

From the early outbreaks to the economic destruction that has come after, the coronavirus pandemic has mapped itself onto America’s longstanding affordable housing problem and the gaping inequality that underlies it. To offset rising rents in a nation where one in four tenant households spend more than half of their pretax income on shelter, a multitude of low-wage service workers have piled into ever more crowded homes

San Francisco, there is a rough economic split. Cities and neighborhoods to the east, places like East Palo Alto, North Fair Oaks and the Belle Haven section of Menlo Park, are more overcrowded and have a larger share of low-income and Black and Latino residents, many of whom have been disproportionately affected by the virus. Towns and neighborhoods to the west, places like Hillsborough and Palo Alto, are whiter and rich.

This geography is as fundamental to how the place operates as the invention of the microchip. Every day, throngs of clerks, landscapers and elder-care workers wake up on the eastern parts and travel to homes on the western parts or to the corporate campuses of tech companies to do subcontracting work. And every night, they return to overcrowded homes.

12 People in a 3-Bedroom House, Then the Virus Entered the Equation
Overcrowding, not density, has defined many coronavirus hot spots. Service workers’ quarters skirting Silicon Valley are no exception.
Conor Dougherty
NYTIMES