Lindsey Graham Is Quietly Preparing a Mess of a Bill Trying to Destroy End-to-End Encryption – Gizmodo

The draft version of the EARN IT Act, which has not yet been formally introduced but is reportedly being circulated by Graham and Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal, bills itself as a way to fight the distribution of child sex abuse material (CSAM) on major platforms. But it does so by threatening Section 230, a core building block of the modern internet that shields tech platforms from liability for user-generated content (for example, it’s why Gizmodo is insulated from libel lawsuits stemming from what happens in the comments section). The EARN IT Act would threaten tech companies like Facebook, Google, and WhatApp’s Section 230 immunity regarding CSAM unless they comply with a set of so-called “best practices” determined by a 15-member commission.

Dell Cameron and Tom McKay, Gizmodo

Is a beanbag a chair? Object Oriented Programming Dilemma.

It is hard to talk about a “chair” if nobody agrees on what a chair is. There is enough of a common example base in OO, the shape, animal, and device-driver examples; that one can start, but beyond that the nature of OO diverges from person to person.
I’ll take that challenge. Find a definition of chair. For any said definition of finite length, their is either an exception to the definition or a thing that is a chair that isn’t covered by the definition. And yet, we can still talk about chairs.

[A lot of this is because OO is a broad church embracing everyone from the prototype-based (Self, Io, JavaScript) to the class-based (Java, SmallTalk, etc ) to those who have built OO systems on top of other paradigms (CLOS, OCaml, various Scheme dialects, Python, Perl). Each of these have various flavors of usage as well so talking about OO without qualifying it usually becomes a meaningless debate about whose definition we shall use.

We can only talk about chairs if we first state that we’re only interested in wooden 4-legged chairs.]

I suppose we have beanbag chairs that are borderline “mini-couches”. But, this gets back to the need for a working classification system for OO. I don’t know if “modeling” can be separated from language or not.

Nobody Agrees On What Oo Is

How To Take Smart Notes by Sönke Ahrens – Book Review

But recently I picked up How To Take Smart Notes by Sönke Ahrens. Ahrens is a Lecturer in Philosophy of Education at the University of Duisburg-Essen and also coaches students, academics, and professionals with a focus on time management, decision-making, and personal growth….

Principle #1: Writing is not the outcome of thinking; it is the medium in which thinking takes place
Writing doesn’t begin when we sit down to put one paragraph after another on the screen or page. It begins much, much earlier, as we take notes on the articles or books we read, the podcasts or audiobooks we listen to, and the interesting conversations and life experiences we have.

Tiago Forte, 10 smart note-taking tips that can boost your productivity

 

The Miseducation of Lisa Simpson, Slashdot on

On Sunday, The Simpsons aired The Miseducation Of Lisa Simpson, an episode in which Marge — with the help of a song from John Legend (“STEM, it’s not just for dorks, dweebs and nerds / It’ll turn all your dumb kids to Zuckerbergs”) — convinces Springfield to use a windfall the town reaped by seizing shipwreck treasure to build the Springfield STEM Academy to ‘prepare kids for the jobs of tomorrow.’ All goes well initially — both Lisa and Bart love their new school — until Lisa realizes there’s a two-tiered curriculum. While children classified as “divergent pathway assimilators” (i.e., gifted) like Lisa study neural networks and C+++ upstairs, kids like Bart are relegated to the basement where they’re prepared via VR and gamified learning for a life of menial, gig economy side-hustles — charging e-scooters, shopping for rich people’s produce, driving ride-share. Hey, it’s not so different from the two-tier caste systems at Google and Facebook, Lisa!

Slashdot

Google Ngram Viewer – Demo

“When you enter phrases into the Google Books Ngram Viewer, it displays a graph showing how those phrases have occurred in a corpus of books (e.g., “British English”, “English Fiction”, “French”) over the selected years.”

Here we typed in the word ‘neurasthenic’, and see its usage in the English 2012 corpus over the period 1800 – 2008.

Neuasthenic 2

Try it out here: https://books.google.com/ngrams

25 Open Datasets for Data Science Projects

Some of the best datasets for data science projects are those created for linear regression, predictive analysis, and simple classification tasks. This list will include the best resources from our past dataset articles tailored for said tasks. We’ll also highlight some of the best websites to search for open datasets on your own.

Lucas Scott, lionbridge.ai

“What are some HTML and CSS techniques, skills, know-how’s that are an absolute must? Just off the top of your head” – reddit user asks

What are some HTML and CSS techniques, skills, know-how’s that are an absolute must? Just off the top of your head from r/webdev

Learn Flexbox in-and-out. Whenever I can’t remember how something related to Flexbox works, this is the go-to article: https://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/a-guide-to-flexbox/

Five Open-Source Projects AI Enthusiasts Might Want to Know About

TensorFlow
The Google Brain team created TensorFlow. Its underlying software powers some of the technologies that Google uses today. It translates languages, improves search engine results, recognizes pictures in Google Photos, and understands spoken words, making its machine learning (ML) capabilities genuinely awe-inspiring.

To the surprise of the tech community, Google open-sourced TensorFlow, making it available to everyone. Developers can create ML models, classes for these models, and write imperative forward passes with it, among others. TensorFlow uses Python, C++, and CUDA.

Brittany Day,  linuxsecurity.com

5 Chrome DevTools Utilities You Need to Know

3. monitor / unmonitor
If we want to track when a method is called on our page we can use the monitor() function…

Alex Ritzcovan,
https://medium.com/dailyjs/5-chrome-devtools-utilities-you-need-to-know-5bfe58c75773

the link was via npm mailing list:

We came across this handy guide from Alex Ritzcovan for the Chrome users out there, including some lesser-known Chrom DevTools utilities you might not be aware of. Here are 5 of their favorite tools provided by the DevTools team.

go to https://www.npmjs.com/ to sign up or browse.

iPhone app is replacing the police notebook in New York

Why the N.Y.P.D. Dropped One of Its Oldest Crime-Fighting Tools
Officers’ most-used item since the 1800s isn’t the gun or handcuffs, but the handwritten activity log. Now an iPhone app is replacing it.

For more than a century, the New York City Police Department has required its officers to keep a detailed, handwritten memo book while on patrol.

“It’s basically our bible,” said Officer Ramses Cruz, who joined a platoon of officers writing down patrol assignments in oversize black leather binders at a recent afternoon roll call at the 90th Precinct Station House in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Corey Kilgannon, NY TImes

Common Misconceptions, Wikipedia List

Ostriches do not stick their heads in the sand to hide from enemies.[265] This misconception was probably promulgated by Pliny the Elder (23–79 CE), who wrote that ostriches “imagine, when they have thrust their head and neck into a bush, that the whole of their body is concealed.”[266]

Bats are not blind. While about 70 percent of bat species, mainly in the microbat family, use echolocation to navigate, all bat species have eyes and are capable of sight. In addition, almost all bats in the megabat or fruit bat family cannot echolocate and have excellent night vision.[264]

Lemmings do not engage in mass suicidal dives off cliffs when migrating. This misconception was popularized by the Disney film White Wilderness, which shot many of the migration scenes (also staged by using multiple shots of different groups of lemmings) on a large, snow-covered turntable in a studio. Photographers later pushed the lemmings off a cliff.[262] The misconception itself is much older, dating back to at least the late 19th century.[263]

Egg balancing is possible on every day of the year, not just the vernal equinox,[254] and there is no relationship between astronomical phenomena and the ability to balance an egg.[255]

Waking sleepwalkers does not harm them. While it is true that a person may be confused or disoriented for a short time after awakening, this does not cause them further harm. In contrast, sleepwalkers may injure themselves if they trip over objects or lose their balance while sleepwalking.[354][355]

see full list at wikipedia

4 Songs I found via Shazam and then bought from iTunes.

Shazam

“Our mission is to help people recognize and engage with the world around them”
Shazam is a mobile app that recognises music and TV around you. It is the best way to discover, explore and share the music and TV you love. Shazam connects more than 1 billion people. It took us 10 years to reach 1 billion tags, 10 months to reach 2 billion, 3 months to go from 10 to 12 billion… It’s an amazing app, available now in the Apple and Android stores. And we’re always looking for new and innovative ways to delight our users.

Random Quiz

Someone who studies ants is a:
The original drummer for The Beatles was:
SQL stands for:
The author of the Foundation series:
Defenestrate means:

Javascript Rising Stars

For the 4th consecutive year, Vue.js is the overall winner of our contest, with more then 30,000 stars added on GitHub in 2019.

No surprises at the following spots: React and the code editor VS Code follow in the same order as last year.

The biggest jump in the rankings is Vue Element Admin, a solution to build nice dashboards using Vue.js components, number 4 this year.

Svelte has been around for a few year but it really took off in 2019 and it holds the position number 5.

TypeScript enters the TOP 10, its success has been one of the main changes in JavaScript landscape over the last years.

Deno, the JavaScript run-time built by the creator of Node.js was one of the newcomers in 2018. It’s still trendy, at the 13th position.

https://risingstars.js.org/2019/en/

Tabulating Crime, Difficulties With

The first problem with understanding crime is that measuring it is harder than it sounds. The Department of Justice approaches the problem in two ways. The F.B.I.’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program, or U.C.R., solicits data from about twenty thousand law-enforcement agencies around the country. Simultaneously, the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ National Crime Victimization Survey, or N.C.V.S., interviews about a hundred and fifty thousand nationally representative citizens, asking them whether they have been victims of a crime.

Both datasets have problems. An obvious one is that there’s no consensus about what counts as criminal activity. In some jurisdictions, only offenses worthy of incarceration are considered crimes. In others, fined infractions also count. (Is speeding a crime? What about manspreading, for which one can be fined seventy-five dollars in Los Angeles?) Because the U.C.R. draws its data from investigators, and the N.C.V.S. relies on victims, they can present starkly different pictures of crime. According to the U.C.R., the incidence of rape nearly doubled from 1973 to 1990. The N.C.V.S., by contrast, shows that it declined by around forty per cent during the same period. Researchers at Vanderbilt University looked into the discrepancy; they found that the upward trend in the U.C.R. data correlated with upticks in the number of female police officers, and with the advent of rape crisis centers and reformed investigative styles. It could be, in short, that a modernized approach to the policing of rape drastically increased the frequency with which it was reported while reducing its incidence. But coherent stories like these only sometimes emerge from the conflicting data.

Matthew Hutson, New Yorker

Mirror Neurons

You’re walking through a park when out of nowhere, the man in front of you gets smacked by an errant Frisbee. Automatically, you recoil in sympathy. Or you’re watching a race, and you feel your own heart racing with excitement as the runners vie to cross the finish line first. Or you see a woman sniff some unfamiliar food and wrinkle her nose in disgust. Suddenly, your own stomach turns at the thought of the meal.

For years, such experiences have puzzled psychologists, neuroscientists and philosophers, who’ve wondered why we react at such a gut level to other people’s actions. How do we understand, so immediately and instinctively, their thoughts, feelings and intentions?

Now, some researchers believe that a recent discovery called mirror neurons might provide a neuroscience-based answer to those questions. Mirror neurons are a type of brain cell that respond equally when we perform an action and when we witness someone else perform the same action.

Lea Winerman, The Mind’s Mirror, apa.org

Should Coal Miners Learn To Code? Slashdot discusses

During a campaign event on Monday, U.S. presidential candidate Joe Biden “suggested coal miners could simply learn to code to transition to ‘jobs of the future,'” reports Newsweek:
“Anybody who can go down 300 to 3,000 feet in a mine, sure in hell can learn to program as well, but we don’t think of it that way,” he said… “Anybody who can throw coal into a furnace can learn how to program for God’s sake…”

Many Twitter users criticized Biden’s comments as reductive. “Telling people to find other work without a firm plan to help them succeed will never be popular,” communications professional Frank Lutz wrote… Congressional candidate Brianna Wu tweeted that she was “glad to see the recognition that you don’t need to be in your 20s to do this as a profession,” but also called Biden’s suggestion “tone-deaf and unhelpful.”

Long-time Slashdot reader theodp notes the response this speech got from New York magazine’s Sarah Jones: “Please Stop Telling Miners To Learn To Code.” And in comments on the original submission, at least two Slashdot readers seemed to agree. “Not everyone can code and certainly not every coal miner or coal worker,” wrote Slashdot reader I75BJC. “Vastly different skills.”

Slashdot reader Iwastheone even shared a Fox News article in which rival presidential candidate Andrew Yang argued “Maybe Americans don’t all want to learn how to code… Let them do the kind of work they actually want to do, instead of saying to a group of people that you all need to become coders.”

But is there something elitist in thinking that coal miners couldn’t learn to do what coders learned to do? It seems like an interesting question for discussion

Slashdot