Author: ehawkes

Bob Marley: An Extraordinary Day- Bob Marley Remembrance – BBC

Bob Marley: An extraordinary day
The Documentary

Forty years after the death of reggae singer Bob Marley, British writer and dub poet, Benjamin Zephaniah, remembers the day Jamaica came to a standstill for the singer’s funeral.

Bob Marley was laid to rest on the 21 May 1981, 11 days after dying from skin cancer.

The extraordinary day saw the island come together to mourn their most famous son – and to celebrate his life and work. He was more than a singer and writer to the people of Jamaica, he was a national hero and prophet with his beliefs in peaceful resolution and Rastafarian religion.

For days leading up to the funeral, tens of thousands of people filed past his body and on the day, thousands lined the streets of Kingston while the 12,000 capacity National Arena was jam-packed.

The outpouring of emotion on the day was unprecedented in Jamaican history with some comparing it to the kind of atmosphere at JFK or Martin Luther King’s funeral.

As Benjamin recalls with some of the people who were in Jamaica that day, everything stopped – even the Government’s budget statement was delayed by a week on the direction of the new Prime Minister.

The singer’s hits could be heard right across the island as sound systems pumped out songs like No Woman, No Cry, I Shot the Sherrif and One Love. Meanwhile two of his sons danced and the Wailers and the I3s performed.

Among those remembering this extraordinary day – I3s singer Judy Mowatt, reggae musician Michael Ibo Cooper, reporter Robin Denselow and Edward Williams who was a 13-year-old boy living in Kingston at the time.

BBC

Home Health Care Workers – The Difference a Union Makes

Their work days are largely similar. Both mother and daughter rise early and make a lengthy commute — up to one hour by car for Danielle and up to two hours by bus for Brittany. They make their clients’ meals. They shop for groceries and clothes, pick up medicine, run to the post office. They care for pets. They dress and undress, change diapers and give baths. They assist with medication. They dust, vacuum and do the laundry. They talk and listen to the stories of their clients’ lives, often for hours.

But the similarities end there. Brittany makes nearly $20 an hour, usually working five days a week. But without child care for her 8-year-old son during the pandemic, she’s been working no more than four. She has paid time off, medical and dental insurance, a retirement plan and many other benefits. Danielle works seven days a week making half Brittany’s wage. She has no benefits through her job, qualifies for Medicaid and is barely able to survive.

These differences come down to where Brittany and Danielle live. Brittany lives in Washington State and belongs to a union of long-term-care workers, S.E.I.U. Local 775, that has worked with the state for better pay and working conditions. Danielle lives in Arkansas, where she has none of that.

Mother and Daughter Do the Same Job. Why Does One Make $9 More an Hour?
By Brigid Schulte and Cassandra Robertson
Ms. Schulte is the director of the Better Life Lab at New America, a progressive think tank, and the author of “Overwhelmed.” Dr. Robertson is a senior policy and research manager at New America.
NYTIMES

Homeless in LA

Homeless service providers and advocates have mixed feelings about a new order from a federal judge that Los Angeles must provide shelter to all unhoused people living on Skid Row by the fall.

In a rare move, Judge David Carter said LA’s decades of bad policy decisions have contributed to a disaster that can only be solved by forcing the city’s hand. But other legal experts see the order as getting the diagnosis right, but the remedy wrong.

Here & Now‘s Tonya Mosley talks about the nuances with Andy Bales, CEO of Union Rescue Mission, and Eric Tars, legal director for the National Homelessness Law Center.

Iain McGilchrist Interview – Hidden Brain

VEDANTAM: Iain argues that the right hemisphere of the brain is supposed to play the role of the wise master of our mental kingdom. The left hemisphere is supposed to be the emissary. Iain says we have grown infatuated with the skills of the emissary. We prize the details but scorn the big picture. He makes an analogy about the relationship between the hemispheres.

MCGILCHRIST: I want to emphasize that I resist very strongly the idea that the brain is a computer. It’s just nothing like a computer, actually. But in this one, limited sense, the left hemisphere is a little bit like a very, very smart computer. So you know what the data you’ve collected mean, but you haven’t yet been able to analyze them. You put them into a machine that is just very clever at carrying out a routine. It doesn’t understand. And then it spews out a result, which it also doesn’t understand. But you then take back into the world where the data come from and go, I see.

So that is the relationship. Your left hemisphere is busy processing things to make sure they’re consistent and unpacked, but your right hemisphere’s seeing everything. I am suggesting that we have arrived at a place, not for the first time in the West, where we have slipped into listening only to what it is that the left hemisphere can tell us and discounting what the right hemisphere could have told us.

https://www.npr.org/transcripts/690656459

Clear Introduction to Modern JavaScript – Node, Webpack, Babel, Grunt

https://peterxjang.com/blog/modern-javascript-explained-for-dinosaurs.html

So this is modern JavaScript in a nutshell. We went from plain HTML and JS to using a package manager to automatically download 3rd party packages, a module bundler to create a single script file, a transpiler to use future JavaScript features, and a task runner to automate different parts of the build process. Definitely a lot of moving pieces here, especially for beginners. Web development used to be a great entry point for people new to programming precisely because it was so easy to get up and running; nowadays it can be quite daunting, especially because the various tools tend to change rapidly.

Theater as Model of World

It has often been said that the Elizabethan theater was the image of the world. The open stage was a busy marketplace, its trapdoor led down to hell, the curtained inner stage exposed the confidences of private life that four walls hide, the balcony was that higher level from which some may look down so that others can look up, and the highest gallery was a reminder that the order of the world is maintained by gods, goddesses, kings and queens.

Threads of Time
Peter Brook

Why is C Preferred for Some Scenarios?


What are common uses of C in the real world outside of embedded and OS dev? from C_Programming

tim36272
Consider expanding what you normally think of as “embedded”: I develop embedded C applications but our box has the same processing power as a gaming computer.

Most safety-critical applications are written in C or Ada.

andai
Most safety-critical applications are written in C

This puzzles me — wasn’t safety one of the main reasons for developing alternatives to C and C++?

tim36272
You’re thinking of things like type safety, garbage collection, etc.

I’m talking about safety in terms of people dying. Things like garbage collection are the opposite of life safety: what if your airplane decided it needed to free up memory ten seconds from touchdown so it ran the garbage collector? What if running the garbage collector caused a valve to respond 0.1 seconds late to a command, which caused a chain reaction resulting in a hydraulic line bursting and losing control of the rudder?

C can be safe because it does exactly what the programmer tells it to do, nothing more and nothing less. There’s no magic going on behind the scenes which could have complex interactions with other behind the scenes magic.

A common example is C++’s std::vector. This container expands as needed to accommodate as many elements as you need. But you have a limited amount of memory on the system, so you need to do static analysis to determine the maximum size of that vector. And you need to be sure that you have enough memory for that plus everything else in your system.

We’ll now you’ve eliminated a lot of the convenience of using std::vector: you might as well just allocate that max size to it and avoid all the overhead std::vector imposes by growing in size.

The other main advantage of std::vector is templates. If you were to use a template in safety critical code you’d need to prove that the code generated by the compiler is correct for every template. We’ll now you’re diving down into all this auto-generated machine code: it would be easier to just write that code yourself and avoid the complexity introduced my the compiler’s template generator.

So, if we’ve eliminated all the usefulness of std::vector, why use it at all?

Repeat that process for most features in most languages and voila! You’re back at C 🙂