Tag: Affordability

WTF is School Lunch Debt?

America, fuck yeah! from r/MurderedByWords

xXx69TwatSlayer69xXx
What the fuck is lunch debt?

DespressoCafe
Just what you think it is.

You buy food at school, if you can’t you get debt.

reach a certain threshold and you can only get a PB&J or some shit. nothing else

Thetallerestpaul
Fucking hell. Free school meals was massive when I was growing up. It’s a social mobility issue as well. Poorly fed kids can’t concentrate, fall further behind and the cycle of being poor and staying poor continues. Breakfast clubs are now in a lot of UK schools so they kids that need it are able to get at least 2 meals. Not sure how lockdown changes that, but when the first lockdown was announced a lot of teachers I know’s first concern was a load of kids aren’t gonna eat now. And aren’t going to be seen by a responsible adult for months. Heart breaking.

But lunch debt is taking it to a whole other level.

Agreeable_Arrival_87
Fun Story: One school was literally threatening to put children into foster care if their families didn’t pay off their lunch debt so a CEO offered to pay off the families’ debts for them and the school told him no.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/24/us/pennsylvania-lunch-debt-offer-trnd/index.html

Another Fun Story: Lunch workers who take pity on children and feed them free meals because a lot of food ends up getting thrown out at the end of the day anyway? Those people are routinely fired.

California Exiles and the Housing Crisis

But there is another factor at play: Californians, fleeing high home prices, are moving to Idaho in droves. For the past several years, Idaho has been one of the fastest-growing states, with the largest share of new residents coming from California. This fact can be illustrated with census data, moving vans — or resentment.

Home prices rose 20 percent in 2020, according to Zillow, and in Boise, “Go Back to California” graffiti has been sprayed along the highways. The last election cycle was a referendum on growth and housing, and included a fringe mayoral candidate who campaigned on a promise to keep Californians out. The dichotomy between growth and its discontents has fused the city’s politics and collective consciousness with a question that city leaders around the country were asking even before the pandemic and remote work trends accelerated relocation: Is it possible to import California’s growth without also importing its housing problems?

“I can’t point to a city that has done it right,” said Lauren McLean, Boise’s Democratic mayor.

That’s because as bad as California’s affordable housing problem is, it isn’t really a California problem. It is a national one. From rising homelessness to anti-development sentiment to frustration among middle-class workers who’ve been locked out of the housing market, the same set of housing issues has bubbled up in cities across the country. They’ve already visited Boise, NashvilleDenver and Austin, Texas, and many other high-growth cities. And they will become even more widespread as remote workers move around.

NYTIMES

Hard Times – Eviction and Unemployment

CYNTHIA: About the end of February, close to March, they laid us off because of the pandemic. And during…

CAMP: She was surviving. And then this pandemic, by no fault of her own, took her job away, took away her ability to pay her rent.

CYNTHIA: They laid us off. They sent the letters, saying, sign up for employment.

CAMP: She struggled to apply for unemployment benefits.

CYNTHIA: So I signed up for unemployment. I didn’t get unemployment till four for five months.

CAMP: And in fact, through the better part of last summer, she did not even receive unemployment.

CYNTHIA: I’m trying to find a place to live. I can’t find nothing. I can’t find another job. I’ve been looking and looking. It’s been a whole year now – you know, going on a year. I still can’t find anything.

SHAPIRO: We’re not using Cynthia’s last name because she doesn’t want this story to affect her future ability to find a place to live. She’s 52 and lives in the St. Louis area with her two adult kids, who’ve also struggled to find work, and her 8-year-old grandson. They’re all in a house where she owes about a year of back rent. There is sewage backing up in the pipes, and the landlord wants them to leave.

CYNTHIA: And I know these people want us out of this house. I want to be out of here just as bad they want us out ’cause I’m not like that, not paying my bills and don’t want to pay. I want to pay.

NPR

Minimum Wage Used to be Enough to Keep a Family of Three Out of Poverty

Amid protests across the country over retail and service jobs that pay little better than the minimum wage, it’s easy to forget that this income benchmark once meant something slightly different. In the past, a minimum-wage job was actually one that could keep a single parent out of poverty.

Since the 1980s, the federal minimum wage has kept pace with neither inflation, nor the rise of the average worker’s paycheck. That means that while a federal minimum wage in 1968 could have lifted a family of three above the poverty line, now it can’t even do that for a parent with one child, working full-time, 40 hours a week and 52 weeks a year (yes, this calculation assumes that the parent takes no time off).

Emily Badger, Bloomberg
December 4, 2013

Cost of Health Care in the US – Some People’s Experiences

Trump Took Credit for Making Insulin “So Cheap It’s Like Water.” Tell That to People Paying For It. from politics

BOOFIN_FART_TRIANGLE
With good insurance my insulin, pump, and glucometer supplies cost over 650 per month.

REO_Jerkwagon
Pretty much. I didn’t mind my insurance at my old job. Never went to the doctor either. When I *did* end up having to have stomach surgery, I quickly learned to hate my insurance company. Tried to tell me hernia repair was fucking elective.

foxnkatz
Yeah that’s ridiculous. A similar thing happened when my wife had appendicitis. They said it was going to burst and as such would have to remove it. Insurance tried to tell her it was elective so they wouldn’t be covering the $77,000 hospital stay. Very crazy.

Deadsolidperfect
I’m a teacher and my insurance SUCKS! I had to pay 10k out of pocket 2 yrs in a row for random medical issues. We have a lot of teachers that are much better off on their spouse’s plan. I’d love to see what a good plan looks like

scrapmoneybenny
It costs $6 for a 3 month supply of insulin, here in Australia. That’s what’s cheaper than water is Trump, not $300 a week 

BOOFIN_FART_TRIANGLE
There are people from the United States in Southern California that open up pharmacies in Tijuana Mexico specifically for the diabetic market in San Diego. In Mexico, they can sell all types of insulins for pennies on the dollar. Less than what a copay is in the United States with excellent insurance. People drive down there and buy insulin, from a pharmacy owned by someone that lives in the US, for cheaper than what they can get it in the US for. It’s stupid.
… Decent plans disappeared long before the aca. They were well on their way out in The late 90s and early 00s (prolly even before that). I owned a business around 2004, and the overhead for employees to get healthcare was so astronomical, that it’s literally the only reason why we kept everyone as private contractors.

Quesoleader
I had the gall bladder removed about four years ago. Still paying off the 20k portion of my bill. It was more (45k) before I fought them over “choosing” out of network doctors when the hospital emergency room I went to was in network.

What People are Paying for Health Insurance

In California, one person told me that the cheapest insurance they could find — for one person, with very little coverage and a high deductible — goes for $330 a month.

I talked to a dog walker in Seattle who pays $675 — without dental coverage.

Another person reported that their bargain basement plan in Minnesota costs $250 a month.

In Dallas, $378 a month for a catastrophic plan with a $10,000 deductible.

And that’s if there’s just one of you: A freelance writer told me she’d had breast cancer, and her husband, a freelance photographer and photo editor, is an insulin- dependent Type 2 diabetic. They live in suburban New York, and currently pay $1,484 a month for coverage.

Anne Helen Petersen, BuzzFeed
How The Gig Economy Screwed Over Millennials

Group Living Rules – Denver Zoning

After an eight-hour meeting that included a public comment period for which 74 people signed up to speak, the Planning Board voted eight in favor (with one member not voting) to forward the proposal to City Council for review. City Council is expected to take it up in October.

Hundreds of people sent written comments to the board ahead of its decision. For months, residents have aired such concerns as fear of having former prisoners as neighbors. People who share housing have pushed for their arrangements to be legitimized.

The proposed zoning code change includes increasing the number of adults who aren’t related who can legally share a single-family home from two to five, with larger homes allowed to harbor as many as 10.

Jason Hornyak told the Planning Board that the changes would allow younger people to do what he did not know was illegal when he arrived in Denver as a recent college graduate: pool resources with others to be able to afford a home and start a life here. Referring to the city Community Planning and Development department that created the amendment, Hornyak said: “Cheers to CPD for making Denver a more equitable city.”

Donna Bryson, August 19, 2020
Denverite

Denver has an immediate need for housing, and the city has made it a priority to address that need by working to make more options available for all residents. Updating zoning rules is one piece of the city’s overall strategy to provide more and better housing opportunities for all residents.

denvergov.org