Tag: Health Care

Cost of Health Care in the US – Some People’s Experiences

Trump Took Credit for Making Insulin “So Cheap It’s Like Water.” Tell That to People Paying For It. from politics

BOOFIN_FART_TRIANGLE
With good insurance my insulin, pump, and glucometer supplies cost over 650 per month.

REO_Jerkwagon
Pretty much. I didn’t mind my insurance at my old job. Never went to the doctor either. When I *did* end up having to have stomach surgery, I quickly learned to hate my insurance company. Tried to tell me hernia repair was fucking elective.

foxnkatz
Yeah that’s ridiculous. A similar thing happened when my wife had appendicitis. They said it was going to burst and as such would have to remove it. Insurance tried to tell her it was elective so they wouldn’t be covering the $77,000 hospital stay. Very crazy.

Deadsolidperfect
I’m a teacher and my insurance SUCKS! I had to pay 10k out of pocket 2 yrs in a row for random medical issues. We have a lot of teachers that are much better off on their spouse’s plan. I’d love to see what a good plan looks like

scrapmoneybenny
It costs $6 for a 3 month supply of insulin, here in Australia. That’s what’s cheaper than water is Trump, not $300 a week 

BOOFIN_FART_TRIANGLE
There are people from the United States in Southern California that open up pharmacies in Tijuana Mexico specifically for the diabetic market in San Diego. In Mexico, they can sell all types of insulins for pennies on the dollar. Less than what a copay is in the United States with excellent insurance. People drive down there and buy insulin, from a pharmacy owned by someone that lives in the US, for cheaper than what they can get it in the US for. It’s stupid.
… Decent plans disappeared long before the aca. They were well on their way out in The late 90s and early 00s (prolly even before that). I owned a business around 2004, and the overhead for employees to get healthcare was so astronomical, that it’s literally the only reason why we kept everyone as private contractors.

Quesoleader
I had the gall bladder removed about four years ago. Still paying off the 20k portion of my bill. It was more (45k) before I fought them over “choosing” out of network doctors when the hospital emergency room I went to was in network.

What People are Paying for Health Insurance

In California, one person told me that the cheapest insurance they could find — for one person, with very little coverage and a high deductible — goes for $330 a month.

I talked to a dog walker in Seattle who pays $675 — without dental coverage.

Another person reported that their bargain basement plan in Minnesota costs $250 a month.

In Dallas, $378 a month for a catastrophic plan with a $10,000 deductible.

And that’s if there’s just one of you: A freelance writer told me she’d had breast cancer, and her husband, a freelance photographer and photo editor, is an insulin- dependent Type 2 diabetic. They live in suburban New York, and currently pay $1,484 a month for coverage.

Anne Helen Petersen, BuzzFeed
How The Gig Economy Screwed Over Millennials

Insulin or Food?

In March, Bolei, 63, who lives in San Rafael, California, was laid off from his job as a maintenance supervisor at a startup that manages real estate properties. After falling behind on rent, he fears he’ll get evicted as rent moratoriums expire.

For the past three months, he’s missed his nearly $3,000 monthly rent payment due to growing medical costs for his partner. She has lupus, an autoimmune disease, and faces $30,000 in medication costs this year to treat a brain injury following a car accident.

‘Insulin or groceries’: How reduced unemployment affects struggling Americans from California to Mississippi
Jessica Menton
USA TODAY

“I can afford to stay alive a little while longer” – Paying for Insulin in the US

"I can afford to stay alive a little while longer" from ABoringDystopia

Negatoris_Wrecks My cousin needs a kidney. He has a volunteer match. Donor’s insurance wont cover it.

TechnicallyHuman But fuck is our health care system broken. I went to a new hospital WITH insurance that’s with in my network and bam. 300$ new patient fee. Never mentioned. Fucking racket.

Telehealth – Freakonomics

Thanks to the pandemic, the telehealth revolution we’ve been promised for decades has finally arrived. Will it stick? Will it cut costs — and improve outcomes? We ring up two doctors and, of course, an economist to find out.

ELLIMOOTTIL: Up until March 2020, less than 1 percent of Medicare patients have ever used a telehealth service.

ELLIMOOTTIL: We’re seeing patients from all over the state who sometimes travel four hours just to have a 15-minute consultation about their kidney stone. And to be honest, I probably knew the answer about how I was going to manage that patient when I looked at their C.T. scan.

CUTLER: It is amazing. We went from essentially no visits for medical care being telehealth to now between 10 and 15 percent of visits for medical care are telehealth. And we did it virtually overnight.

The Doctor Will Zoom You Now (Ep. 423)

2 Covid Tests, Same Place, Same Result – One cost X, One Cost Y

The two got drive-through tests at Austin Emergency Center in Austin. …

The emergency room charged Mr. Harvey $199 in cash. Ms. LeBlanc, who paid with insurance, was charged $6,408.

“I assumed, like an idiot, it would be cheaper to use my insurance than pay cash right there,” Ms. LeBlanc said. “This is 32 times the cost of what my friend paid for the exact same thing.”

Ms. LeBlanc’s health insurer negotiated the total bill down to $1,128. The plan said she was responsible for $928 of that.

Two Friends in Texas Were Tested for Coronavirus. One Bill Was $199. The Other? $6,408.
It’s an example of the unpredictable way health prices can vary for patients who receive identical care.
Sarah Kliff
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/29/upshot/coronavirus-tests-unpredictable-prices.html

He Got Tested for Coronavirus. Then Came the Flood of Medical Bills.

In an isolation room, the doctors put him on an IV drip, did a chest X-ray and took the swabs.

Now back at work remotely, he faces a mounting array of bills. His patient responsibility, according to his insurer, is now close to $2,000, and he fears there may be more bills to come.

By Elisabeth Rosenthal and Emmarie Huetteman
Ms. Rosenthal is editor in chief of Kaiser Health News, where Ms. Huetteman is a correspondent.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/30/opinion/coronavirus-test-cost-bill.html

Fighting the Insurance Company – Example of

After My Son Suffered a Traumatic Brain Injury, I Was Told Insurance Would Cover His Medical Bills. I Was Dead Wrong.

When RJ was discharged from the ICU after three weeks, he was transferred to a rehab facility. After he got there, they called me on the phone and said, “Your insurance company called and said RJ’s rehab benefits are up on Friday.”

I said, “No, no, no, no. That’s covered. I was told by my insurance company that this facility is covered for at least 60 days and possibly more. We have more time.”

But all I had was a voice on the phone. Without written proof, without the summary plan description, I couldn’t prove it. So when the rehab facility got another call from my insurance telling them these benefits had lapsed and I couldn’t prove otherwise, I went to the facility and I asked, “Where am I supposed to take him? He’s in a coma.” I remember a social worker telling me I could look into foster care.

Months passed, and I still couldn’t get the summary plan description. I kept calling my insurance company, and they’d be telling me my benefits, and I’d say, “You’re giving me information that you’re looking at. Give me, like, a screen grab of your computer screen.” But they wouldn’t do it. They kept telling me it was being “revised.”

I did some research, and I found out that under a law called ERISA—the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974—I was entitled to the details of my insurance policy.

So I called an ERISA lawyer and told him the situation, and he said, “I can help you, but you’re going to have to give me a retainer of $30,000.”

Stephanie Peirolo
First told at a show by the Moth, the live storytelling group, at the Neptune Theatre in Seattle

Readers digest: https://www.rd.com/true-stories/survival/when-insurance-stops-paying/

Stephanie Peirolo is executive director of the board of the Health Care Rights Initiative, a nonprofit providing advocacy and navigation services for patients and caregivers. This story was excerpted from All These Wonders.