Tell Your Lawmaker to Protect the Programs That Feed Hungry Kids

1 in 7 kids in America struggle with hunger. This takes a profound toll on their health, their happiness, and their ability to find success in the future.

But ending childhood hunger is a problem with a solution. As a member of congress, you have the chance to help end hunger for kids in our country. Please support and protect the federal nutrition programs that provide children in need with consistent, reliable access to food.

This is important for kids; it’s also important for your state. When we make sure kids get the food they need, they feel better, learn more and grow up stronger. And that means a smarter, healthier, economically stronger state.

Programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, school meals and WIC work together to make sure kids have access to the food they need, regardless of zip code, age or time of year. This is fundamental to ending childhood hunger in our state and across America.

I urge you to support these programs. Kids are counting on you.

You can go here and send this message to your lawmaker:
No Kid Hungry

What’s classy if you’re rich but trashy if you’re poor? AskReddit


What’s classy if you’re rich but trashy if you’re poor? from AskReddit

chowderneck
The most expensive thing you own is a really old car.

splonkFlooper
Having a lawyer’s business card in your wallet.

Spoonhorse
Being called Duke. Or Earl.

Itskevin91
Living at a hotel

audguy
Getting money from the government.

waleed2198
Showing up to a formal occasion in t-shirt and jeans.

Cocobean4
Substance abuse. Rich people are ‘troubled’ whereas poor people are just junkies.

CadetCovfefe
Also mental disorders. Howard Hughes locks himself in his room, doesn’t shower and starts pissing in bottles and he’s an eccentric genius that gets a movie made about him by Martin Scorsese. Dude down the block does it and he’s just a nut.

reddit

My take – Moving around. If you’re rich it means you travel and are jet set. If you’re poor it means your transient and rootless.

A Place at the Table – Food Insecurity in the United States


A documentary that investigates incidents of hunger experienced by millions of Americans, and proposed solutions to the problem.
Directors: Kristi Jacobson, Lori Silverbush
Stars: Jeff Bridges, Tom Colicchio, Ken Cook

SNAP is one of the most effective and efficient federal programs, as well as one of the most responsive, providing additional assistance to needy families during economic downturns. It’s also one of the most-needed: 46 million Americans rely on SNAP benefits to buy food each month, according to the USDA. Two-thirds of these benefits go to households with children.

1 in 7 kids in the United States face hunger, and 20 million of those children are in families who rely on the food they get from SNAP.

https://www.nokidhungry.org/who-we-are/hunger-facts

Poverty and Shame

Adam Smith put his finger on the problem back in 1776. In The Wealth of Nations, he wrote: “A linen shirt, for example, is, strictly speaking, not a necessity of life. The Greeks and Romans lived, I suppose, very comfortably though they had no linen. But in the present times, through the greater part of Europe, a creditable day-labourer would be ashamed to appear in public without a linen shirt …”

At last, a sensible way to measure poverty, Tim Hartford, Financial Times

What struck him, even in the mid 1970s, was the effort that mothers, in particular, made to try to protect their children from feeling shame – to the extent that they would skip meals to buy clothes and toys for them. “Children as young as seven and eight soon learn strategies to persuade parents to buy them what they think they need,” says Walker.

What are the links between shame and poverty? Chris Arnot, The Guardian

More recently, this relational understanding of poverty has been championed by Amartya Sen who has argued that ‘the ability to go about without shame’ should be considered a basic capacity that should be incorporated into general conceptions of poverty.

https://gsdrc.org/publications/shame-self-esteem-and-poverty/