Tag: Art

2022 Oscar Nominees Animated Shorts – List of

ROBIN ROBIN
Dan Ojari and Mikey Please
UK
When her egg rolls into a rubbish dump, Robin is raised by a loving family of burglar mice. As she grows up, however, her differences become more apparent. Robin sets off on the heist to end all heists to prove to her family that she can be a really good mouse, but ends up discovering who she really is.

BOXBALLET
Anton Dyakov
RUSSIA
Delicate ballerina Olya meets Evgeny, a rough boxer who personifies “strong but silent.” With very different lives and worldviews, will they be brave enough to embrace their feelings? Can two fragile souls hang on to each other despite the world’s cruelty?

AFFAIRS OF THE ART
Joanna Quinn and Les Mills
UK/CANADA
Welsh housewife Beryl muses on her lifelong passion for art as well as her family’s eccentric yet endearing obsessions with everything from screw threads to pet taxidermy.

BESTIA
Hugo Covarrubias and Tevo Díaz
CHILE
The life of a secret police agent during the military dictatorship in Chile in 1975 is explored as her relationships with her dog, body, fears and frustrations reveal a grim fracture of her mind and of the country.

THE WINDSHIELD WIPER
Alberto Mielgo and Leo Sanchez
SPAIN
Inside a café, after lunch and while smoking a whole pack of cigarettes, a middle-aged man asks himself and the audience an ambitious question: What is love?

You can check out trailers here:
https://shorts.tv/theoscarshorts/

Art – Making Order out of Chaos – Sondheim Quote

GROSS: You know, that actually really fits into what you were talking about wanting rules and structure in music.

SONDHEIM: Yeah. Order out of chaos. Order out of chaos. That’s why I like crossword puzzles – order out of chaos.

GROSS: Right. Right. Right.

SONDHEIM: I think that’s what art’s about anyway. I think that’s why people make art.

GROSS: To create order in…

SONDHEIM: To – out of chaos. Yeah.

GROSS: …In a world that’s chaotic? (Laughter).

SONDHEIM: The whole – the world has always been chaotic. Life is unpredictable. It is – there is no form. And making forms gives you solidity. I think that’s why people paint paintings and take photographs and write music and tell stories and – that have beginning, middles and ends, even when the middle is at the beginning and the beginning is at the end.

‘Fresh Air’ remembers Broadway legend Stephen Sondheim (Part 1)

The Power of Art and Self Expression – Example of, Anecdote

Ask a little kid to tell you about a painting they’re working on. It’s a miraculous thing. And I don’t think it’s unreasonable to aspire to that level of artistic liberation. I believe it’s still there in all of us. I wrote about this in my first book, but I think it’s worth emphasizing: During my stay in a mental hospital some sixteen years ago now, I witnessed this childlike superpower reassert itself, take hold, and transform a woman who was virtually catatonic in an art-therapy class. I think about it almost every day.

A sixty-something heroin addict who had spent the better part of the previous thirty years in and out of institutions and living on the streets – and whom I had not heard make a sound in any of the group therapy sessions, or even in the smoking room – drew a simple picture of herself. It wasn’t great. But it looked like her.

When she held it up for the class to see, I heard her voice for the very first time. She said she couldn’t remember the last time she had held a pencil. She smiled! And cried. Everyone clapped and gathered around to hold her. It was such a stark, amazing, healing thing to see someone’s eyes light up – become human again – when they realized they had the power to make something that wasn’t there.

How to Write One Song
Jeff Tweedy

Pieter Bruegel’s The Triumph of Death

The_Triumph_of_Death_by_Pieter_Bruegel_the_Elder

The painting shows a panorama of an army of skeletons wreaking havoc across a blackened, desolate landscape. Fires burn in the distance, and the sea is littered with shipwrecks. A few leafless trees stud hills otherwise bare of vegetation; fish lie rotting on the shores of a corpse-choked pond. Art historian James Snyder emphasizes the “scorched, barren earth, devoid of any life as far as the eye can see.” In this setting, legions of skeletons advance on the living, who either flee in terror or try in vain to fight back. In the foreground, skeletons haul a wagon full of skulls; in the upper left corner, others ring the bell that signifies the death knell of the world. People are herded into a coffin-shaped trap decorated with crosses, while a skeleton on horseback kills people with a scythe. The painting depicts people of different social backgrounds – from peasants and soldiers to nobles as well as a king and a cardinal – being taken by death indiscriminately.

Wikipedia

Black Death – Broom vs Rake

The Black Death quickly entered common folklore in many European countries. In Northern Europe, the plague was personified as an old, bent woman covered and hooded in black, carrying a broom and a rake. Norwegians told that if she used the rake, some of the population involved might survive, escaping through the teeth of the rake. On the other hand, if she used the broom, then the entire population in the area were doomed. The Plague-hag, or Pesta, were vividly drawn by the painter Theodor Kittelsen.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Death_in_medieval_culture

Mummy, There’s an old woman coming
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https://www.nasjonalmuseet.no/en/collection/exhibition/no0006508465

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodor_Kittelsen