Tag: Hell

Guantanamo Mixtape

Here follows a sample of the songs played again and again at maximum volume to break the will of enemy combatants at Guantánamo Bay and other US detention centers around the world. In the context of harsh interrogation with no legal recourse or hope of freedom, these songs and others like them became the soundtrack of Hell for those subjected to them.

Christina Aguilera, “Dirrty”
Barney and Friends, “I Love You Song”
Deicide, “Fuck Your God”
Drowning Pool, “Bodies”
Eminem, “Kim”
Marilyn Manson, “The Beautiful People”
The “Meow Mix” Theme
Nine Inch Nails, “Somewhat Damaged”
Queen, “We Are the Champions”
Britney Spears, “. . . Baby One More Time”

Bruce, Scott G.
The Penguin Book of Hell

Heaven and Hell are Within You

An old monk on Mount Athos in Greece once told me that people rejoice in the thought of hell to the precise degree that they harbor hell within themselves. By which he meant, I believe, that heaven and hell alike are both within us all, in varying degrees, and that, for some, the idea of hell is the treasury of their most secret, most cherished hopes — the hope of being proved right when so many were wrong, of being admired when so many are despised, of being envied when so many have been scorned.

And as Jesus said (Matthew 6:21), “Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.”

David Bentley Hart, NY Times

The Penguin Book of Hell

“I think hell’s a fable,” the famous professor proclaimed—a surprising declaration not only because it was made in the late sixteenth century, when very few people would have dared to say such a thing, but also because he was at that moment in conversation with a devil to whom he was offering to sell his soul. The professor in question was Doctor Faustus in Christopher Marlowe’s great Elizabethan tragedy. Bored with his mastery of philosophy, medicine, and law, Faustus longs for forbidden knowledge. “Where are you damned?” he asks Mephastophilis, the devil whom he has conjured up. “In hell,” comes the prompt reply, but Faustus remains skeptical: “How comes it then that thou art out of hell?” The devil’s answer is quietly devastating: “Why this is hell, nor am I out of it.”

Damn it All, Stephen Greenblatt reviews –
The Penguin Book of Hell
edited by Scott G. Bruce
Penguin, 279 pp., $17.00 (paper)
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@ New York Review of Books