Common Misconceptions, Wikipedia List

Ostriches do not stick their heads in the sand to hide from enemies.[265] This misconception was probably promulgated by Pliny the Elder (23–79 CE), who wrote that ostriches “imagine, when they have thrust their head and neck into a bush, that the whole of their body is concealed.”[266]

Bats are not blind. While about 70 percent of bat species, mainly in the microbat family, use echolocation to navigate, all bat species have eyes and are capable of sight. In addition, almost all bats in the megabat or fruit bat family cannot echolocate and have excellent night vision.[264]

Lemmings do not engage in mass suicidal dives off cliffs when migrating. This misconception was popularized by the Disney film White Wilderness, which shot many of the migration scenes (also staged by using multiple shots of different groups of lemmings) on a large, snow-covered turntable in a studio. Photographers later pushed the lemmings off a cliff.[262] The misconception itself is much older, dating back to at least the late 19th century.[263]

Egg balancing is possible on every day of the year, not just the vernal equinox,[254] and there is no relationship between astronomical phenomena and the ability to balance an egg.[255]

Waking sleepwalkers does not harm them. While it is true that a person may be confused or disoriented for a short time after awakening, this does not cause them further harm. In contrast, sleepwalkers may injure themselves if they trip over objects or lose their balance while sleepwalking.[354][355]

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